Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘APP’

About to Light It Up!

We are just about ready to launch LET IT BE & LIGHT IT UP!

Four months ago, I was sitting in meditation. I use an app with a zen bell on my phone to begin and end sitting in the morning. When the bell rang, a thought appeared (just before I opened my eyes). Wouldn’t it be supportive to have a visual body on the screen that filled with light, in corresponding parts of the body, as one practiced a mindful body scan? Many people are visual learner’s and with this body scan app, it assists one and all. After researching the idea, I realized that there are no similar apps available.

Since that time, we’ve refined the meditation content, had it recorded beautifully by voice-over artist and child advocate, Carla Sikand, and the video creatively rendered by Francis Batagglia at Green Rocket. Janet Brumbaugh, at Lynx Software, brought it home combining all the aspects and programming. I’ve often remembered to “Let it be”, as we met each change and challenge.

We’ve received some very kind quotes from people who tested the app and are submitting it to Apple tomorrow. We’ll let everyone know when it is available. It can take up to two weeks before it is approved and a release date is set.

In the meantime, LET IT BE & LIGHT IT UP!

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A Cell Phone & A Good Book

From Forbes
by Parmy Olson
Tech 4/09/2013

This Simple App Could Put E-Books On Millions Of Phones In The Third World

It sounds counterintuitive, but in certain developing nations it’s easier to get hold of a cell phone than a good book.

More than one in three adults cannot read in sub-Saharan Africa, yet almost every home there has access to at least one mobile phone, according to USAID. Developing nations are among the fastest growing mobile markets in the world, but literacy is still a big problem.

David Risher, a former executive at Amazon and c0-founder of non-profit organization Worldreader, thinks there’s an obvious answer here: offer free books through all those cell phones.

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On Wednesday Worldreader Mobile comes out of “beta” mode. About a year ago it partnered with biNu, a mobile app platform for feature phones in developing countries, so that its Worldreader Mobile app would appear on the home screen.

Richer says that in the last year, 10% of biNu’s 5 million-user base have accessed the Worldreader Mobile app. That’s about 500,000 people. Risher hopes to get that number to 1 million by the end of 2014.

Worldreader’s biggest readers are in India (nearly 107,000 users), with 60,800 in Nigeria and 33,100 in Ethiopia.

Most of them are using low-end, pre-pay Nokia phones with physical buttons, that cost about $50. They will typically spend about $2-3 a month on their data plans. Out of the 6.4 billion active mobile phones in the world today, 5.4 billion are so-called features phones like these, according to Worldreader statistics sourced from Analysys Mason.

The books they’re reading are short, typically taking up 150 screenshots. Though men are early adopters, women are the “power readers,” Worldreader says, reading an average 17 books a month.

The most popular books are romance novels. Among the top five most popular books in the last month, the No. 1 was a children’s book about school, the second an basic algebra book, and No.’s 3 and 4 were entitled My Guy and Can Love Happen Twice?

Risher says it’s not unnatural in sub-Saharan African culture to see people hunched over reading their cell phones for long periods at a time. So pervasive have mobile device become that some elementary schools in Ghana have even started banning them, he notes.

Most of the books on Worldreader Mobile are in English, with a few in local languages like Swahili, French and Spanish, though the number of books overall is increasing. Currently there are 1,200 titles available, donated by local and English-language publishers.

“I think the single biggest thing that will get more people reading is putting more book on there,” says Risher. “Everything form the Bible and Koran, to romance novels.” Books on mobile phones are another way to get health information to people in rural communities, who often have access to pharmacies and relatively cheap, generic drugs, but encounter pharmacists with little sound medical knowledge.

Read complete article, with additional information, links and photos, at Forbes.

Sumatran Tigers Rainforest

Gabriel,

Great news. We’ve won another huge victory for Sumatran tigers and the Indonesian rainforest they call home.

Thanks to your hard work, Kroger — which was previously the largest seller of Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) consumer tissue products in the US — has put out a public statement saying it will stop sourcing from APP. We only launched this campaign in October and within five days over 50,000 people like you took action. It’s clear that Kroger got the message.

The bad news is that APP still wants to sell tissue linked to rainforest destruction here in the US. Even after losing its largest US customer, APP is still refusing to take the simple steps needed to solve this problem. And, there are still major retailers in this country selling APP products. Kmart is one of the largest.

Our campaign is clearly working. Help us keep up the momentum and tell Kmart to follow Kroger’s lead by removing APP’s tissue products from its shelves until APP cleans up its act.

Rainforest destruction wrapped up in the form of throw-away tissue products is starting to pop up all over the US. Often stores selling the products don’t even know it. Together we can change that, harnessing the power of the marketplace to save forests in Indonesia.

Now is the time to keep the pressure up. That is why it is so important that you take a minute now to tell Kmart that there shouldn’t be any space for rainforest-destroying toilet paper on its store shelves.

With only 400 Sumatran tigers left, we can’t stop now. Now is the time to re-double our efforts, stand tall, and tell retailers not to buy APP tissue products until it ends its deforestation habit for good.

For the forests,

Rolf Skar
Greenpeace Senior Forest Campaigner

P.S. If we want to get Kmart to do the right thing, we need to spread the word far and wide. After you take action, please be sure to forward this email to friends and family who you think would also like to help out. The last 400 Sumatran tigers — and their rainforest home — are depending on us.

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