Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘authors’

A Book’s Fate

51Lxqzd5JpL._SY346_Being Indie: A No Holds Barred Self-Publishing Guide for Fiction Authors by Eeva Lancaster. Reviewed by Gabriel Constans.

Ms. Lancaster states right up front that, “Books have a publishing standard, and Indie authors are accountable to their readers in making sure these standards are met or exceeded.” Being Indie explains how to meet that standard and provides steps for doing so. It also describes how to be a “savvy Indie author”, as opposed to simply getting your book published.

The author of Being Indie practices what she preaches. The book’s cover catches the eye, the layout and editing are well done, and the content very relevant. She also has an excellent on-line and social media presence. These are all aspects of being an indie author which are clearly defined and presented. This is an excellent resource for anyone considering, or in the midst of, publishing their own book.

There are three parts to this work. Part One (Pre-Publishing) includes sections on – From Manuscript to Book – The Editing and Proofreading Stage – What Type of Editor Do You Need? – How to Approach Cover Design – Book Design and Formatting – Fixed Layout or PDF. Part Two (Building Your Author Platform) has information on – Your Website or Blog – Guest Posting – Your Online Presence – Social Media Presence. Part Three (Post Publishing) is a recap of the first two sections.

What I appreciate most about Being Indie is the experience, and knowledge, the author has about the process and the honesty with which she speaks. There is no sugar-coating, or sells pitch, trying to get you to buy her products, or do it here way. Being an indie author takes a lot of hard work and diligence. Very few make a living doing so. Ms. Lancaster says, “Doing nothing, and leaving a book’s fate to the gods, will only ensure failure. It will not sell itself. No one will buy it if it’s less than a book should be. No one will notice it if it’s not attractive. That’s the reality. The sooner you realize this, the better.”

 

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A Cornucopia of Value

51a7xrY5DzLPublishing Tools of the Trade Every Author Must Know by Lama Jabr.
Reviewed by Gabriel Constans

This book caught me off guard, and in a very good way. I’ve done a lot of research over the years into writing, publishing and marketing books, and thought I was aware of most of the resources available for writers. Girl, was I wrong.

Publishing Tools of the Trade Every Author Must Know is a cornucopia of valuable links to most every legitimate, helpful site that I’ve know about, plus many others that I had not heard of before. There is a brief description, and the direct link, for every website listed.

Sections range from “Editing and proofreading”, “Book promotion sites”, and “Author Interview Opportunities”, to “Blogs”, “Marketing” and “Social Networking Sites for Authors”. Every area of this resource manual is also updated regularly, so there are few links out of date.

What is most amazing, and appreciated, is that all this information is assembled in one place and provided for free. Lama Jabr has given us a unique service, without strings. Her kindness, and care, in putting this together, and offering it without charge, deserves deep gratitude.

For further information about Lama Jabr and Xana Publishing and Marketing:
http://xanapublishingandmarketing.com

Fiction That Encourage Thought

2657Books That Everyone Should Read At Least Once
Books that encourage thought.

From Goodreads

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
2. 1984 by George Orwell
3. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
5. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
6. Animal Farm by George Orwell
7. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
8. The Cather in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
9. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
10. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

See list of 100 and much more at Goodreads.

If it was my list, I’d have Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston at the number one spot.

Lambda Literary Awards

26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards

“I work best after the deadline has passed, when I’m in a panic.” – Tony Kushner

For our authors and publishers: Don’t panic yet, but the December 1st deadline for Lammy submissions is less than a month away. If you want your book to be considered for a Lambda Literary Award, please review the Guidelines here and complete the online submission process TODAY.

LammySeal-actualsize_2013-e1377558848107

The 26th Annual Lambda Literary Awards are open to works published in 2013, so if your book will be published after December 1 but on or before December 31, it is still eligible for Lammy consideration. You just need to complete the initial submission process before the December 1st deadline and send a request to awards@lambdaliterary.org for an extension so that you will have time to send your books to our office as soon as they are printed.

If you believe your work has already been submitted for Lammy consideration, it’s still a good idea to go to our online submissions list and make sure that your book is listed and that it has been entered in the correct Lammy category. Sometimes a form is correctly filled out, but for some reason never gets sent. Sometimes an author believes the publisher has submitted the book and the publisher believes the publicist has submitted the book and the publicist… well, you know the rest.

For our readers: We’ve received more than 300 submissions from 170 publishers, but the bulk of the submissions will come in right before the deadline (like, one minute before…). You can help us ensure that every eligible book has the opportunity to be considered for a Lammy by checking out the Lammy submissions list and making sure that your 2013 favorites are all accounted for. If they aren’t, please let the authors know right away so they can submit their books before the December 1st deadline. Or write to us at awards@lambdaliterary.org and we will contact the author/publisher.

Send comments or queries to awards@lambdaliterary.org.

Kathleen DeBold, Administrator
Lambda Literary Awards

Please Come Again

Excerpt from The Penis Dialogues: Handle With Care by Gabriel Constans. Recommended by Eve Ensler (The Vagina Monologues).

Please Come Again

Men can have multiple orgasms without ejaculating. You heard me right – multiple orgasms without ejaculating. Though they seem to occur simultaneously, an orgasm takes place seconds before ejaculation. If you learn to stop, control and/or delay coming, you can have an orgasm, retain your erection and come again and again. It takes practice and concentrated awareness of your body, but you can’t go wrong because you end up having an orgasm either way, and you can practice alone or with your partner.

Without ejaculation, the semen is reabsorbed into the body and the orgasmic contractions massage the prostate, which actually enhances health and vitality. You get all the pleasure combined with the added benefit of knowing it’s good for your health too! Sort of like a tasty low-fat meal.

There are a number of books that talk about this Chinese Taoist technique and philosophy. I would highly recommend The Multi-Orgasmic Man: Sexual Secrets Every Man Should Know. Its authors are Mantak Chia and Douglas Abrams (a local Santa Cruz author and teacher).

New World of Publishing

Laura Davis and Janet Goldstein are presenting The New World of Publishing 2011: Today’s Rules for Developing Ideas and Finding Your Audience on May 21-22 in Santa Cruz, CA. You can register by going HERE. If you think of it, tell them I sent ya.

Both of these women are amazing writers, teachers and visionaries. I’d encourage anyone remotely interested to attend. Here is some information from the website.

Whether you are a first-time fiction or nonfiction writer, an accomplished author, an expert in your niche with a book or blog idea, or a business or nonprofit leader who wants to make an impact with your ideas, this hands-on event will give you a “from the trenches” perspective of the publishing world. You will learn about the interconnection between writing and marketing, creating and connecting.

Different from all other writers’ conferences and publishing events, this 2-day intensive will combine up-to-the-minute information on the current state of publishing world with the time, space, and direction you need to begin to test, hone, revise, and “pitch” your work in small groups and in “idea lab” demonstrations. You’ll workshop:

Your Idea – including Janet’s hallmark “8 Ingredients of a Good Idea” and her brand-new Daisy Model for taking projects from “good” to GREAT.

Your Platform – the what and whys, the hows, the fears, and benefits of starting to build your audience now.

Your Publishing Pathway – Work through all 4 pathways:- ebooks- print-on-demand- self-publishing- traditional publishing: major houses & boutique, to discover the right pathway for you, your genre, and your stage—including why all the pathways are good.

Your Plan – there will be time for “burst writing” and making commitments to personalize your workshop experience.

www.GetPublishedSantaCruz.com

How Old Are You?

It happened right before my eyes and I didn’t see it. How could I have missed it? How could I be so blind? My son, Brendon, had grown from a little boy into a man. It was his eighteenth birthday and we were flying to London, England; the land of Dickens and Shakespeare; the place he’d wanted to visit since junior high school.

It wasn’t their famous authors or history that he was interested in, it was the pull of a large, exciting, cosmopolitan city filled with nightlife, plays, clubs, art and the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation).

This was our trip; a father and son fulfilling a childhood dream, spending time together without any of his brothers, sisters or other parents. The journey ended up being more than a travel adventure. For me, it was a wake up call and reminder of life’s limits; of values and validation; of remembering what’s important and letting go of what isn’t.

Brendon ended up making a lot of decisions, deciding what to do, where to go and how to get there. He read the fine print on the train or bus schedules; the print I couldn’t read; the words that were a blur of small letters to my aging eyes.

“You need some new glasses,” he said. Imagine, my son telling ME what I need!

“It’s this way,” he’d say, referring to the right direction to visit a certain district or tour.

“No. No. It’s over here,” I’d insist.

Nine out of ten times he was right. Imagine, my son, the little boy I’d carried in my arms and on my back, telling ME which way to go! My son, walking longer and farther day by day, finding his way to a late night club by himself; not wanting me to come with him. Imagine that!

Not only did his independence and energy make me feel old, but it also instilled a new found respect and appreciation for who he is and how he lives in the world. He was kind and considerate to all those we met and responsible enough to have the courage to ask for help when needed. I was proud to be his father.

Being with my son outside the U.S also opened my eyes to the advantages and disadvantages of living in America. Though it’s still difficult and not everyone in The States is feeling financially stable, it was still a lot cheaper for food, rent, utilities and gas here, than it was in England. Petro in Great Britain costs the equivalent of five to six dollars per gallon (as it does throughout most of Europe) and groceries run about fifteen percent more. In general, there’s more space in America than in England. Houses and apartments are like little gingerbread boxes there and the toilets (rarely referred to as bathrooms) are just big enough to squeeze into and close the door.

On the other hand, the English seem to feel much more connected with a larger community, not as isolated as our country can be. Their coverage of the news was more diverse, including all the worlds’ peoples and countries, not just there own.

The Brits’ live IN history, surrounded by centuries of monuments, castles, museums and ruins. Their past seems more alive at times than the present, whereas we in the U.S. tend to view anything over two days old as ancient or irrelevant.

Best of all, the English seemed friendlier than I had remembered when I visited twenty-odd years before this trip. Everywhere we traveled, whether it was in the beautiful green countryside, small Elizabethan villages or in London, with its numerous historical sites and exhibits; people would say, “Lovely.” Giving us change for a purchase the clerk would say, “Lovely.” Opening a door for someone entering or leaving a building resulted in another “Lovely. Thank you.” When responding to a statement about an object, person or event, we’d hear another “Lovely, isn’t it?”

Much to Brendon’s embarrassment, lovely became my favorite word. I started repeating it, with the best British accent I could muster, day in and day out. For me, it implied an appreciation and acceptance of the momentary human interaction, an acknowledgment of the beauty and joy available at our fingertips. When people asked about our trip, it’s easy to sum up my love of Brendon and our time in England together in one simple word “Lovely”.

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