Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘birds’

Drinking A Wiley Coyote

Wiley Coyote Smoothie

The coyote is a North American wild dog closely related to the wolf. Many native peoples have stories and beliefs surrounding the coyote, often referred to as the trickster who outsmarts both friend and foe. Coyotes dfend their chosen “territory,” howl in chorus, and mate for life. The Wiley Coyote may make you howl, too. As far as mating for life goes, that’s another story.

images

Yield: 4 cups

2 tablespoons raisins
1 ripe banana
1 cup apricot nectar
1 tablespoon carob powder
1/2 cup apple juice
1/2 cup soy milk
1/2 cup firm tofu

Place tall the ingredients in a blender, and mix on medium speed for 1 minute.

Pour into tall glasses, serve, drink and howl for more.

Great-Am-SmoothiesExcerpt from Great American Smoothies: The Ultimate Blending Guide for Shakes, Slushes, Desserts, & Thirst Quenchers by Gabriel Constans

Drink Up Masai Giraffe

images-1The Masai Giraffe

The giraffe is also known as Giraffa camelopardalis. Try saying that clearly ten times in a row. If you’ve succeeded without blubbering or getting lockjaw, pour yourself a Masai Giraffe to celebrate. These wonderful beings roam the southern areas of East Africa and may reach a height of 18 feet. The Masai Giraffe is a thick, rich, and colorful lunch or supper drink.

Yield: 2 cups

1 cup sliced, cooked carrots
2 tablespoons raisins
1 cup firm tofu
2 cups soy milk
2 tablespoons brown sugar

Place tall the ingredients in a blender, and mix on medium speed for 1 minute.

Pour into tall glasses and serve standing on a ladder.

Great-Am-Smoothies

Excerpt from Great American Smoothies: The Ultimate Blending Guide for Shakes, Slushes, Desserts, & Thirst Quenchers by Gabriel Constans

The Honey Bunny

The Honey Bunny

images-1Bunnies are better known as rabbits or hares. They’re cute, cuddly, furry, and wiggle their noses and hop around on large back legs. Everyone loves them. In the wild, they’re prey for many animals, and in captivity they’re prey for children who want to snuggle and squeeze them to death. Remember, this drink is not an animal. Do not squeeze it or try to make it hop, or it could get quite messy!

Yield: 4.5  cups

2 ripe bananas

1/3 cup banana-strawberry yogurt (dairy or non-dairy)

1/4 cup firm tofu

3 tablespoons honey

2 cups milk (soy, rice or dairy)

Place tall the ingredients in a blender, and mix on medium speed for 45 seconds.

Pour into tall glasses, serve and bounce with delight.

Great-Am-SmoothiesExcerpt from Great American Smoothies: The Ultimate Blending Guide for Shakes, Slushes, Desserts, & Thirst Quenchers
by Gabriel Constans
(One of the first books of smoothies published in North America.)

Nature Spring & Climate

Dear Gabriel,

Check out our We Love Nature page to learn about animals at risk from climate change. It’s March and spring is in the air. Days are longer. Birds are migrating north to fill our yard with their cheerful trills. And out of our windows, we watch nature come back to life.

Here at EDF, we’ve decided to spend March celebrating all that nature gives us — and all that we’re fighting to protect. Will you join us?

ArcticFox_160

Kick off our “We Love Nature” month with us! Start by checking out our Warming and Wildlife slideshow. We all know climate change has put polar bears at risk — but it’s also threatening the rest of these beautiful, unique creatures.

As I read about the struggles of the Arctic fox, the sea turtle, and even the flamingo, I was reminded why I come to work at EDF every day — and why incredible supporters like you stand with us.

I hope you’ll click through to view our Warming and Wildlife slideshow. If you enjoy the show, please share it with your friends as well, and stay tuned for more nature love throughout the month!

Thank you for your activism and support,

Heather Shelby
Action Network Coordinator
Environmental Defense Fund

Death By Plastic

Dear Gabriel,

CAE_Pacific_YEG_Donate-Button_v1Are you are as proud as I am about our work to reduce “death by plastic” among Pacific wildlife?

Think about it: Because of your action and our advocacy, there are fewer sea birds entangled by plastic trash, and fewer sea turtles starving because they were unlucky enough to mistake a throwaway plastic bag for a jellyfish.

As 2012 comes to a close, we’ve helped win plastic bag bans that will soon cover more than 50 communities in California. This means billions fewer plastic bags are being tossed away each year. Amazing, don’t you agree? And we couldn’t have done it without you.

But we are far from done.

That’s why we’ve set a goal of raising $150,000 by Dec. 31 to help launch the next chapter of banning plastic bags in California.

Will you make a special year-end donation to Environment California and help us free more Pacific wildlife from plastic pollution?

Together, we began this campaign just a few years ago for one simple reason: Because we believe that nothing we use for a few minutes should pollute the Pacific and threaten wildlife for hundreds of years.

In 2012, you helped us achieve a remarkable string of victories, including:

When 2012 started, California was home to only 14 local bans on plastic bags. As 2012 comes to a close, now more than 50 local communities have stood up to ban plastic bags and keep plastic out of the Pacific Ocean.

In May, when the largest city in the state, Los Angeles, was considering a bag ban, the chemical lobby was in City Hall every day. Meanwhile, we hit the pavement and generated over 1,000 phone calls from the City Councilors’ constituents. The Council voted almost unanimously to protect the ocean. Our biggest win yet.

Best of all, these victories are keeping billions of plastic bags out of the Pacific, freeing sea turtles, sea birds and other marine wildlife from harm and “death by plastic.”

As we enter a new year, I want to shift this campaign into overdrive — to educate more people and recruit more Californians to end our wasteful throwaway habits … to convince more counties, cities and towns to stand up to Big Plastic … and to keep the pressure on our state legislators to make California one of the first states in the U.S. to ban the bag statewide.

The alternative? Researchers from the University of California at San Diego recently found a 100-fold increase in plastic particles in the ocean over the past 40 years.

We’re polluting our ocean at an increasingly rapid pace, with damaging effects on species already under stress from overfishing, habitat destruction and climate change.

And every time a sea turtle mistakes a plastic bag for a jellyfish, the plastic settles in its stomach, never to digest. The turtle thinks it’s full. Soon, it starves and dies.

But let’s face it. Big Plastic isn’t in business to care about the Pacific or its wildlife. As long as there’s money to be made in throwaway plastic bags, they’ll keep spending millions on lobbyists, campaign contributions, lawsuits and other intimidation tactics and propaganda to stop us.

Caring about the Pacific and its wildlife is our job and we can’t stop now.

We’ve set a goal of raising $150,000 by Dec. 31 so we can power up the biggest, boldest, most effective campaign yet to free Pacific wildlife from plastic pollution.

Gabriel, you know as well as I do what we’re up against. But you also know that when we work together, we can do great things. That’s how we helped save 70 state parks from closure this past year. That’s how we helped increase solar power 600% over the last 6 years. And that’s how we helped pass plastic bag bans that will soon cover more than 50 communities in California, including the second largest city in this country, Los Angeles.

Now it’s time to join forces again to help end death by plastic in the Pacific.

As you think about all we’ve accomplished, as you weigh the challenges that lie ahead, and as you consider your year-end giving choices, I hope you’ll agree: Our throwaway habits have threatened Pacific wildlife long enough. Stand with me today and we’ll have even more to be proud of next year.

Are you with me?

Dan Jacobson
Legislative Director
Environment California

Deafening Sea Cannons

Halt the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project

Started by: tobey, Cambria, California

The goal of the seismic imaging project is to attempt to measure the three major earthquake fault lines which run along our coast. The existence of these fault lines, especially after the continuing disaster at Fukushima, Japan, call into question the advisability of maintaining the Diablo Canyon nuclear power facility, operating near Avila.

The proposed testing will do nothing to prevent an earthquake on any of these fault lines. The tests will instead produce a large amount of data about dangers that we cannot avoid when these earthquakes occur.

Here is how the environmental impact report for the project describes it:

“The offshore component of the Project would consist of operating a geophysical survey 29 vessel, its associated survey equipment, and support/monitoring vessels . … The survey would be conducted along the central coast from approximately Cambria to Guadalupe (including marine protected areas around Cambria and elsewhere). … 18 active air guns … would discharge once every 15 to 20 seconds.”

In other words, huge underwater cannons would blast ear-shattering sounds under the water in an area from Guadalupe to Marin County. (These same measures are used to search for offshore oil reserves — coincidence?)

The environmental impact report indicates these tests would kill or injure marine mammals, including seals, dolphins, whales and otters. They could make them go deaf which would mean a lingering death. Already depleted fishing resources would be impacted. Seabirds would be affected as well, with little or no way of mitigating the impacts. Migratory birds would be affected as the tests would go on 24 hours a day and lights at night would be required. Air quality would be impacted and the project would contribute to climate change.

The ocean is our most precious resource. If the life of the ocean does not matter then neither do our lives. Some few persons stand to make lots of money from this outrageous project. PG&E will pass on the costs to us, the consumers. We and all life in the ocean and the land around us stand to lose. And for what?

The project will not prevent the next earthquake. And if it happens and Diablo crashes, so do we. Think of the economic impact of such a disaster. A recent issue of The Economist has on its front cover a statement that says the dream of nuclear power has become a nightmare. It is time to put our resources into safe energy and abandon nuclear power. Please sign this petition.

FOR LATEST INFORMATION PLEASE GO TO STOP THE DIABLO CANYON SEISMIC TESTING PROJECT AT

http://www.facebook.com/StopTheDiabloCanyonSeismicTesting

Photo by Mike Baird, flickr.bairdphotos.com

Click here to sign tobey’s petition, “Halt the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project“.

You can also check out other popular petitions on Change.org by clicking here.

Little Fish Big Fish

Dear Gabriel,

Seabirds carry small fish from the oceans to their nests to feed their babies, but soon they may be finding less to eat. Humans are fishing more and more of these little fish to feed to larger fish in fish farms or to grind up as fertilizer, and the oceans are feeling the pressure.

These little fish provide food for everything from whales to seabirds to people, and science shows they are too important to the future health of the oceans and the earth to just be ground up into fishmeal or fertilizer.

Whales and birds need fish too. Tell the Pacific Fishery Management Council to protect sea creatures’ dinners»

A humpback whale may eat up to 2,000 pounds of little fish every day. If we overfish and cause a population collapse for the little fish, whales and other animals could have a hard time finding enough to eat.

But it’s not too late to take action. If we set up precautionary protections for small “forage” fish and let their populations grow, there will be more food to go around in the future—even for us humans.

Let’s save the little fish. Sign today to protect forage fish and keep the oceans fed»

Small fish swimming in schools are easy to catch. But it will become a lot harder if we catch them all, and animals like whales and baby birds will have to face the consequences of our actions.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

When Animal Friends Die

They say cats have nine lives. I wish that were true, but the facts contradict such myths. Everything dies, including the felines, dogs and other creatures we choose to care for and have in our lives. Most animals tend to have a shorter life span than humans, thereby increasing the chances that our beloved friend will stop breathing long before we leave our mortal bodies behind.

To add insult to injury; is the often callous or dismissive attitude and comments of others when we’ve lost a non-human friend. People don’t always understand the emotional impact losing a pet can have. They disregard our pain when we try to talk about the cat or dog we’ve had for fifteen years getting sick and needing constant attention. They scoff at our tears, when our affectionate tabby is lost or killed by a car. They belittle our sense of shock and disbelief when the dog we loved and cared for tenderly for the last eight years suddenly dies.

Yet, for some, pets, animals, and companions (which ever you prefer to use as a label for non-human creatures) are some of the closest and endearing connections we experience in life. Being responsible for any of the varied creatures placed in our care takes time, attention and devotion. And, just like people, such continued time and attention creates attachment, bonding and lasting imprints.

The love and commitment we give and receive from our animal friends, in some respects, are quite unique from that of other relationships. Sometimes, they are the only living beings that love us unconditionally and don’t argue, judge or hurt us in any way. They also provide forms of communication beyond words. There desire to be touched, patted, combed, and talked to provide warmth, softness, connection, meaning and continual reminders of enjoying the present moment.

A lady I recently met was shocked when told by her veterinarian that their beloved kitten had cancer and should be euthanized. She refused and is currently seeking a vet that will give Hospice-type services for her cat and provide whatever is needed to make sure her family friend dies comfortably at home enjoying as many precious moments that remain. Like human beings, there should be an alternative for animals beyond that of further treatments or mercy killing.

Losing a pet also reawakens other losses we’ve experienced; whether recent or long ago. When a cat of ours, named Sushi, was killed by a dog a couple years ago, I unexpectedly found myself remembering my childhood collie, named Pinky and the grandmother I used to visit when Pinky was still alive.

The loss of your animal friend should be treated the same as that of a human.
Talk about the loss; share your pictures, memories, tears and grief. Walk, run, swim, workout, hike, bicycle, dance, play or listen to music a couple of times s a week by yourself or with a friend.

Breathing exercises, visualizations, relaxation, stretching, meditation, affirmations and yoga have all been shown to relieve stress, anxiety and positive endorphins to help the body heal.

Relax in a hot tub, hot bath, shower, sauna or sweat lodge and let the emotions seep from your pores and evaporate with the steam.

Put together a collage, altar, memory book, picture frame, treasure box, video or CD of your cat, dog, bird, horse or rabbit.

Have a service or gathering. Memorials and/or funerals; provide validation of your relationship with that being; acknowledgment that their life was of value; and societal affirmation that all living creatures are to be honored and respected.

If you’ve lost an animal friend, at any time in your life and would like some additional support (outside your circle of family and friends) contact the SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty Against Animals), an empathetic therapist or your local grief-counseling center.

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