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Posts tagged ‘Bureau of Land Management’

Don’t Frack California

Dear Gabriel,

ban_fracking_CA_180California still has zero regulation to protect our health and water from dangerous fracking — but that’s not stopping the Bureau of Land Management from auctioning off almost 18,000 acres of land for oil drilling and fracking next week.

Fracking contaminates precious water with toxic chemicals, generates cancer-causing air emissions, and in California could pollute crucial agricultural water and lands in the Central Valley, as parts of Monterey, San Benito and Fresno counties are being auctioned off.

California’s environmental regulators are still drafting fracking regulations and fracking is exempt from many critical environmental laws like the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, so the BLM’s rush to auction off federal mineral rights puts Californians totally at the mercy of the fracking industry and should not move forward.

Tell Bureau of Land Management California State Director James Kenna: Don’t frack California. Click here to automatically sign the petition.

Each fracked oil well permanently contaminates millions of gallons of water with toxic chemicals that can leak into nearby water sources and wells. That puts California’s farming communities, many of which sit on top of oil that would be extracted with fracking, at risk in cases of fracking spills, accidents or leaks. Worse, because many of the oil leases being sold by the BLM are underneath private land, farmers may not even have a right to say no to oil development on their land!

We know what the result of California’s rush to frack will be if we don’t stop it now. In states like Pennsylvania, Texas and Colorado, fracking is making landowners sick, killing livestock, poisoning water, devastating rural land values, and even possibly introducing toxic chemicals into our food supply, all while making us more reliant on planet-warming fossil fuels.

Many of these devastating effects are irreversible. That’s why it’s so important for the BLM to put its foot on the brake now, before selling off rights to oil companies to move ahead with totally unregulated fracking in California.

Tell Bureau of Land Management California State Director James Kenna: Don’t frack California. Click here to automatically sign the petition.

Thank you for standing up to the fracking industry.

Zack Malitz, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

Save Bryce Canyon

Save Bryce Canyon from Dirty Coal

Dear Gabriel,

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is on the verge of approving a massive 3,500 acre coal mine right next to Bryce Canyon National Park.1

The BLM’s own analysis shows that the mine will cause major adverse environmental impacts like increased water and air pollution,2 devastating a huge area directly next to Bryce Canyon’s unique ecosystem.

Despite these concerns the BLM just released its environmental review proposing that the mine be approved. BLM is currently accepting public comments on its proposal and strong public opposition is needed to convince the BLM to reverse course and reject this dirty coal mine.

Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Don’t allow coal mining next to Bryce Canyon National Park. Click here to submit a public comment.

The Bureau of Land Management’s review identified more than a dozen negative impacts this proposed mine is likely to have. These include water quality degradation, increased hazardous air pollution, loss of wildlife habitat, increased coal truck traffic and noise levels, adverse effects to recreation resources and an increased risk of fuel leakage, solid waste spills and wildfires.

In addition to the problems the BLM identified, burning coal from the proposed mine would also be a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, which experts say are now growing faster than previously anticipated worst case scenarios.3

Given all of the problems this mine is expected to cause, it simply isn’t in our best interests. Yet the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed action is to allow this dirty, 3,500-acre coal mine to move forward.

National Parks and federal lands belong to all of us, and BLM needs to hear from people who don’t want these special recreation areas and wildlife habitats — especially not Bryce Canyon — to be endangered in order to mine for dirty coal.

Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Don’t allow coal mining next to Bryce Canyon National Park. Click here to submit a public comment.

Thanks for fighting to protect Bryce Canyon from the threat of coal mining.

Josh Nelson, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

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