Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘egg’

Eggy – Son of Chicken

Eggy – Son of Chicken

Our cat friend of 18 years stopped breathing air and died today. We put him in the ground to say goodbye and help him nourish new life. Our daughter named him Eggy (because his mother’s name was Chicken). Eggy came into our lives when our son Shona was 2 years old and he was the last of our children still at home.

Eggy was born to be a lap cat and my daemon. He sat on my lap when I read and meditated and was constantly laying across my legs when I wrote and was at the computer. For those familiar with the The Golden Compass series, you will understand immediately what “daemon” means. For those who haven’t read the wonderful trilogy by Philip Pullman, here is one definition.

The words “daemon” and “daimon” are Latinized versions of Greek, in reference to the daemons of ancient Greek religion and mythology. “Daemons are benevolent or benigh nature spirits, beings of the same nature as both mortals and gods, similar to ghosts, chthonic heroes, spirit guies, forces of nature or the gods themselves.

We are grateful for the years Eggy was physically present and the ways in which he will always be with us.

Here are some photos of Eggy and me reading a book about chocolate and on Shona’s desk when Shona was about 4 years old and Eggy was 2.

DSC_0139-Eggy-Reading

shonaEggy copy copy

Chickens Home to Roost

From ROP Stories on Twitter

Cluck cluck cluck. Check out our newest residents! Soon they’ll be popping out eggs to improve the boys’ nutrition. Raising chickens not only supplies protein for the students, but also teaches them how to care for livestock and perhaps even sale some of the eggs for future revenue.

Please support The Rwandan Orphans Project Center for Street Children
Kigali, Rwanda

Easter’s Origins

Christians celebrate Easter Sunday as the day that the Jewish teacher, Jesus of Nazareth (later called The Christ), was resurrected (or disappeared) from the tomb within which his body was encased. This celebration is actually one of the more recent spring celebrations, which has morphed from and into many traditions. Pagans have celebrated the ideas and realities of death and rebirth for thousands of years.

One of these festivals celebrated Eostre (The Goddess of Dawn). She was linked to the egg and rabbit or hare and fertility. Others say the modern rabbit connection is a German tradition from the 1500s, when German’s changed the pagan rabbit image into a large bow-tie wearing rabbit named Oschter Haws, who was said to lay nests of colored eggs for good children.

The equinox, at the end of March, is also marked by Christians, Neopagans and Wiccans, many of whom hold celebrations on the eve of day of the equinox. The Eastern Orthodox churches also have Easter services, but they are a month or two later in the year.

The Religious Tolerance site has the following information about Easter’s origins.

The name “Easter” originated with the names of an ancient Goddess and God. The Venerable Bede, (672-735 CE.) a Christian scholar, first asserted in his book De Ratione Temporum that Easter was named after Eostre (a.k.a. Eastre). She was the Great Mother Goddess of the Saxon people in Northern Europe. Similarly, the “Teutonic dawn goddess of fertility [was] known variously as Ostare, Ostara, Ostern, Eostra, Eostre, Eostur, Eastra, Eastur, Austron and Ausos.”

Her name was derived from the ancient word for spring: “eastre.” Similar Goddesses were known by other names in ancient cultures around the Mediterranean, and were celebrated in the springtime. Some were:

Aphrodite from ancient Cyprus
Ashtoreth from ancient Israel
Astarte from ancient Greece
Demeter from Mycenae
Hathor from ancient Egypt
Ishtar from Assyria
Kali, from India
Ostara a Norse Goddess of fertility.

An alternative explanation has been suggested. The name given by the Frankish church to Jesus’ resurrection festival included the Latin word “alba” which means “white.” (This was a reference to the white robes that were worn during the festival.) “Alba” also has a second meaning: “sunrise.” When the name of the festival was translated into German, the “sunrise” meaning was selected in error. This became “ostern” in German. Ostern has been proposed as the origin of the word “Easter”.

There are two popular beliefs about the origin of the English word “Sunday.” It is derived from the name of the Scandinavian sun Goddess Sunna (a.k.a. Sunne, Frau Sonne). It is derived from “Sol,” the Roman God of the Sun.” Their phrase “Dies Solis” means “day of the Sun.” The Christian saint Jerome (d. 420) commented “If it is called the day of the sun by the pagans, we willingly accept this name, for on this day the Light of the world arose, on this day the Sun of Justice shone forth.”

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