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Posts tagged ‘Egyptian’

Egyptian Blogger Speaks Out

From Nation of Change and Democracy Now
28 December 2011
Interview with Alaa Abdel Fattah

Democracy Now! speaks to Fattah about the Egyptian revolution’s ongoing struggle against the military regime and his ordeal in one of Egypt’s worst prisons.

Alaa Abdel Fattah, a prominent Egyptian revolutionary activist and blogger, has been released from prison after nearly two months behind bars. Fattah was ordered jailed by a military court on October 30 and summoned to face charges that included inciting violence — a charge he firmly denies. He refused to cooperate, rejecting the legitimacy of the military court who wanted to try him as a civilian. Democracy Now! speaks to Fattah about the Egyptian revolution’s ongoing struggle against the military regime and his ordeal in one of Egypt’s worst prisons, which prevented him from attending the birth of his first son. Fattah’s trial comes just as Egypt’s ousted leader, Hosni Mubarak, returns to a Cairo courtroom today to face charges over the deaths of 840 protesters during the uprising against his rule. “What comes next might be even tougher and even more difficult,” Fattah says, “but I don’t think that this revolution is going to end without really completely renegotiating the order of power in Egypt and across the Arab world.”

Read article and watch interview at Nation of Change.

12,000 and Counting

Dear Gabriel,

Wow! In 48 hours, over 10,000 people from more than 100 countries signed our petition to free Egyptian activist and blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah. Alaa, whose appeal was denied today, is one of the 12,000 civilians who have stood before military tribunals since the fall of Mubarak. Let’s see if we can get one person to sign this petition for every civilian detained — 12,000 of us for 12,000 of them. Add your name here now or send this link to your friends:

https://www.accessnow.org/free-alaa

Access, along with other RightsCon speakers and attendees, has been pressuring representatives from the U.S. government and the European Parliament to demand that Egypt ends emergency rule, frees Alaa, and ceases trying civilians before military courts. By standing with all those like Alaa, our collective voice will embolden our leaders to action.

Sign the petition, share it with your friends and family through e-mail, post the petition to Facebook, and tweet the message below:

https://www.accessnow.org/free-alaa

With hope,
The Access Team

Tweet: 12K for 12K. A signatory for each civilian detained by mltry courts in Egypt. @accessnow petition to #FreeAlaa. http://bit.ly/rMf6nb

Specters by Radwa Ashour

My review of Specters by Radwa Ashour, for The New York Journal of Books.

If Specters were as good as its opening line “The valley was full of ghosts” it could have been intriguing, but it is not. The remaining story is a mishmash that moves from first person to third, past to present, young to old, and fiction to nonfiction. Rather than adding depth and nuance to the book, these devices distract from the flow, storyline, and telling of the tale or tales, as the case may be.

Egyptian born and American educated author Radwa Ashour begins by stating that the book is about two women born on the same day: herself and another woman she calls Shagar. Shagar’s life is summarized in the first five pages, with more details interspersed throughout.

One of the more enlivened and affecting scenes is when Shagar meets a new teacher in sixth grade, Fawzi, who tells them to “Ask and think.” He disappears suddenly, and Shagar learns from his family that he was arrested, most certainly for having such revolutionary ideas as to tell his class to question and think about what they are taught or believe. MORE

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