Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘endangered’

These Whales Need Help

sperm_whale_pod_mailingDear Gabriel,

Sperm whales are family creatures
. The endangered whales travel in pods with their relatives and spend years raising their young. But the time they spend carefully raising each child means that it will take a very long time for these creatures to replenish their numbers and rise out of endangered status.

And while we wait for their numbers to grow, healthy sperm whales are having their lives cut short by drift gillnets off the coast of California. Drift gillnets are mile-long walls of nets that are left out in ocean waters overnight to catch swordfish and thresher sharks. But these nets also catch these endangered whales. We need your help to save them.

You can help stop the unnecessary killing of sperm whales. Donate today to help meet the $50,000 goal by May 15»

Southern California’s deep waters are home to an abundance of squid—a sperm whale’s favorite snack. And while pods of whales are swimming in these squid-rich waters, they may find themselves facing a wall of nets.

In 2010, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) estimated that 16 sperm whales became entangled in drift gillnets off of Southern California. For Pacific sperm whales, which take so long to give birth and which have such a small population, those 16 whales were irreplaceable. If we continue to allow drift gillnets to kill these whales, their future is at risk.

Sperm whales can grow to over 50 feet long and weigh 40 tons. You would think these massive creatures would not have much to fear, but a mile-long net wrapped around their fins or tail can keep them from swimming, cause lethal injury, and even trap them underwater. A sperm whale can hold its breath for a long time, but if it’s held underwater overnight in a drift gillnet, it will drown.

It’s time to stop this practice. Oceana is working to convince NMFS and the state of California to phase out this deadly gear type and replace it with cleaner gears, but we need help to keep up the fight.

Give by May 15 to help us protect endangered whales and the world’s oceans»

Your support will help us fund our work to protect ocean ecosystems off the California coast and across the globe. Our work has resulted in great victories in these waters—from establishing a protected area for leatherback sea turtles to stopping an expansion of these deadly drift gillnets—and now it’s time for us to continue the fight and end drift gillnetting in California altogether.

Thanks for all that you do.

For the oceans,
Rachael Prokop
Oceana

Washington State Wolves

Dear Gabriel,

It took animal activists five years of dedication and persistance to pass legislation to preserve the recovering wolf population in Washington State. The “State Wolf Conservation and Management Plan” has helped protect Washington’s wolves and start their comeback. Now that success is just over the horizon, two bills pending in the state legislature are trying to gut the plan and undo all its hard-won progress.

greywolf200x160

S.B. 1588 and S.B. 5193 would allow livestock owners and their agents to kill wolves without any permit or permission – even if they were endangered, even if they were not attacking any livestock. The bills would also strip the State Wildlife Agency of all wolf management and killing authority, moving it down to local county officials.

We cannot allow all the hard work of Washington’s animal activists to be undone. Send a message today to urge Washington’s legislature to oppose to S.B. 1588 and S.B. 5193, and protect Washington’s wolves.

Thank you for all that you do,

Jason N.
Care2 and ThePetitionSite Team

Powerful Majestic Creatures

Dear Gabriel,

Sperm whales are one of the world’s most powerful, majestic sea creatures – but they’re no match for drift gillnets.

In just one year, an estimated 16 sperm whales were drowned in gillnets off the coast of California. That’s not counting the sharks, turtles, dolphins, and other open ocean animals that are caught in greater numbers.

These nets, which are supposed to catch swordfish, are notorious for killing some of our oceans’ most endangered species. They should be banned—but instead they continue to kill turtles, sharks, whales and more.

That kind of indiscriminate killing of ocean wildlife cannot be allowed to continue, so we are fighting to stop the use of swordfish drift gillnets off the coast of California.

You can help us meet our $40,000 goal if you chip in – and until October 31, every gift you give will be MATCHED for double the impact. Donate just $10 today and join the fight to stop deadly gillnets»

The destructive power of gillnets cannot be underestimated, even for the formidable sperm whale.

Up to 65 feet long and weighing over 50 tons, these deep diving whales can hold their own against nearly anything in the oceans. But sperm whales were prized by whalers in the 18th and 19th centuries for the spermaceti oil contained in their large heads, and were hunted mercilessly.

They grow slowly, taking time to raise their young between births. Without human interference, a sperm whale may live to be 70 years old. But a young whale caught in a net doesn’t just lose those decades of life—it loses its chance to have babies and help replenish a population still struggling from the effects of whaling.

Six weeks ago, we filed our formal intent to sue the federal government for violating the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. This is precisely the kind of action that will force the government to protect endangered ocean wildlife threatened by gillnets.

While they can be expensive, these lawsuits work. A similar lawsuit in 2009 forced the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service to grant protections for the endangered loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles. Our fight against the use of drift gillnets in places where endangered sea creatures reside could save more turtles and whales – but only if we have the resources we need to win.

With your help, we can continue the fight for sperm whales and other ocean creatures around the world. Give $10 today and we’ll DOUBLE your support!»

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Sea Turtles Survive

Dear Gabriel,

Every North American sea turtle is at risk—but we can save them together

Donate now to win important protections for sea turtles and the oceans we share»

Have you ever had the chance to see a sea turtle in the wild?

It’s no surprise if you haven’t. Six different species of sea turtles live in North American waters, but thanks to disappearing nesting beaches and destructive fishing gear, every single one of them is listed by the federal government as being threatened or endangered with extinction.

Sea turtles and the oceans that depend on them are in trouble – and we need your help if we’re going to save them. Give now to help reach our goal of $100,000 by the December 31st deadline.

Every year, sea turtle nests get crushed by people and cars. The baby turtles that hatch must get past a slew of predators in the air and water. And the precious few that make it into deeper waters and adulthood must somehow survive a gauntlet of fishing hooks and gear that kill thousands of turtles each year.

We can’t keep losing so many sea turtles. Not only are sea turtles a vital part of a healthy ocean ecosystem, they are some of the oldest living animals on our planet. Unless we do more to protect sea turtles now, our children and grandchildren may never get a chance to know these incredible creatures.

Thankfully, there is good news. Because of your financial support, Oceana has won many important victories, saving thousands of sea turtles and improving the health of our oceans.

Just this past summer, we took action to stop thousands of needless turtle deaths in the Gulf of Mexico. Our researchers uncovered shrimpers illegally using nets without turtle escape hatches. Without these escape hatches, sea turtles get trapped under water and drown to death. Your support allowed us to expose this crime against sea turtles and our oceans, and it will allow us to hold the government accountable for enforcing the law.

This kind of victory couldn’t have happened without your support. And if we’re going to build on that progress and win more, we’ll need your help once more.

Oceana is the largest organization in the world that takes a comprehensive approach to protecting sea turtles in every ocean at every stage of their life. We play a critical role by looking at how one fishery’s activities add to another’s, and at how protecting turtles in one ocean can impact the other side of the planet. Your contribution will fund our campaigns to protect areas sea turtles need in order to recover, and to hold the government accountable under the Endangered Species Act.

Be the reason we can save sea turtles today – and prevent an ocean with no turtles tomorrow. Make a tax-deductible donation to Oceana today.

For the oceans,
Tatiana Marshall
Oceana

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