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Posts tagged ‘famine’

Ranked #7 & #2 In Top 100

Dear Gabriel,

img2I am thrilled to tell you CARE was ranked #7 in the Global Journal’s Top 100 NGO list and #2 among NGOs that engage in humanitarian relief work. I am so proud of our field staffers and happy to see that their tireless work toward changing the world is getting the recognition it deserves.

As you may have read, we are grappling with a drop in charitable gifts coupled with high demands for our help in the field. If you haven’t already, I hope you’ll consider making a tax-deductible gift to help ensure we can maintain our poverty fighting work at full strength.

It is your generosity that helps us address suffering in the fallout of crises – like violence in Syria and Mali. And it is your generosity that allows us to stay for the long-term, helping new mothers remain healthy, relieving hunger, empowering girls, and much more. Thank you, as always, for your support.

Sincerely,

Helene D. Gayle MD, MPH
CARE

The Famine Is Still Here

Dear Gabriel,

The crisis gripping the Horn of Africa may have slipped from the headlines; however, the reality is it’s getting worse.

CARE remains on the ground at the refugee camps in Dadaab, Kenya, where hundreds of thousands of people are seeking help. People are dying on the long and dangerous journey to the camps — including many children. Those who make it arrive in desperate need of food, water, shelter and medical services.

Will you please make a gift now to provide immediate relief in the Horn of Africa and support long-term programs that help fight hunger and poverty around the world?

Our work in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia is only reaching a small portion of the more than 13.3 million people in the region who face starvation. The problems are numerous, including a famine in parts of the Horn of Africa, the skyrocketing cost of food and the fact that people are losing their sole means of income as their livestock perish in the parched landscape.

Every dollar counts. Your gift can help feed a starving child, see that a mother has clean water for her family, help whole communities become resilient to droughts and floods and so much more.

Consider how your generosity can make a difference:

— $450 can provide a month’s worth of water for 50 refugees in Dadaab.
— $144 can provide a teacher and teaching supplies so children in the camps get their education.
— $70 can provide six months of extra nutrition for a child or pregnant woman.
— $25 can give enough seeds to an Ethiopian family to grow five months’ worth of food.

Hopefully, the coming months will bring rain, but it will take years for surviving families, farmers and pastoralists to fully recover from this devastating crisis.

By making a gift today, you can help save lives — and help empower many of the world’s most vulnerable people, especially women and children, to escape poverty and hunger for good.

While no one can predict when or where the next crisis will arise, CARE helps prepare communities at high risk to better respond to natural disasters, rising food costs and other shocks. For example, in one community in Kenya, CARE partnered with villagers to erect water pumps, dig effective irrigation canals and form microfinance groups that help people save and diversify their income. Today, during the worst drought to grip the region in 60 years, the families in that village are able to better cope with the disaster.

Thousands of similar success stories are waiting to be created — with your help. Please show your generosity and compassion by making a gift to CARE today to help us carry out our lifesaving and life-changing work around the world.

Sincerely,

Helene D. Gayle, MD, MPH
President and CEO, CARE

Africa Famine and Ikea

From BBC 30 August 2011 Last updated at 10:34 ET

East Africa famine: Ikea makes record $62m aid pledge.

The charitable arm of the furniture giant Ikea is donating $62m (£38m) over the next three years for people in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya. The funds will go through the UN refugee agency, which said it was the largest private donation it had received in its 60-year history.

Dadaab, which mainly houses Somalis, is the biggest refugee camp in the world.

Its population has swollen by 150,000 in past months, following drought and famine in the Horn of Africa.

It now holds some 440,000 people, despite only being designed for 90,000.

The money from the Ikea Foundation will be used to expand emergency relief and assist up to 120,000 people, said the UNHCR.

“This humanitarian gesture by the Ikea Foundation comes at a critical time,” said Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Refugees.

“The crisis in the Horn of Africa continues to deepen with thousands of people fleeing Somalia every week. We are extremely grateful. Help like this can’t come a moment too soon.”

A spokesman said said the UN had examined the donation with “due diligence” before it was accepted, news agency AP reported.

The UN says tens of thousands of people have already died in Somalia alone, and some 3.2m others are thought to be on the brink of starvation.

In a statement, chief executive officer of the Ikea Foundation Per Heggenes said the donation was a “bold but natural extension of Ikea Foundation’s longstanding commitment to making a better everyday life for children and families in need throughout the developing world”.

Ikea spokesman Jonathan Spanpinata told the BBC that the donations would not include any flatpack furniture – though it has previously sent mattresses and duvets to Tunisian refugees.

The furniture chain is the world’s largest and published financial results for the first time last year, showing that total sales were 23.1bn euros ($31.7bn; £20bn) for the year ending in August.

It did not provide profit figures.

Read more at BBC.

Help Horn of Africa

Don’t wait. Please act now!

From The Hunger Site

They’re calling it “The Children’s Famine.” More than 12 million people are at risk of starvation in the Horn of Africa, including at least 1.25 million children who are “in urgent need of life saving interventions,” according to OCHA. Hundreds of thousands of additional children are severely malnourished.

This humanitarian crisis is caused by an unprecedented drought in the region, where families traditionally rely on livestock and farming for food. Food prices have spiked, crops and livestock are failing, and rivers are at their lowest levels in recent memory.

Displaced families desperate for food and water are spilling across borders and overwhelming refugee camps. “In many of the poorest communities,” reports UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake, “people are either too poor or too weak to be able to try to walk for help.”

Mercy Corps has worked in the region for years, and is on the ground actively providing help in the places where it is most needed. Tens of thousands in Ethiopia have received emergency food and clean water distributions. In Somalia, cash-for-work programs are helping drought-affected families fill vital needs including food, water, and other essentials. Mercy Corps hopes not only to help people survive in the face of the current crisis, but to make these communities strong enough to thrive once it has passed.

You can help. Every penny of your donation provides emergency aid that is desperately needed in the Horn of Africa during this time of crisis.

Report from the Field

Mercy Corps
August 2011

Mercy Corps is actively engaged in Somalia, Kenya, and Ethiopia. They report that their drought response in the region includes:

SOMALIA
· Our work in Somalia will help more than 260,000 drought-affected people fill vital needs like water, food, and other essentials.
· We work directly with communities to ensure that aid gets to the people who need it. We run programs in Puntland, Somaliland, and the Central region.
· Emergency operations build on our work to provide education to Somali children, improve governance, and build more peaceful communities.

KENYA
· Our team in northeastern Kenya has started programs in over twenty villages in bone-dry Wajir County.
· We are helping 120,000 people gain life-saving access to water. Where there is no water, we’re trucking in hundreds of thousands of liters. Where there are water systems, we’re bringing in emergency fuel to keep water pumps running.
· We have found there is food on the market in northeastern Kenya, but people don’t have money to buy it. Vouchers, a likely next phase of work, provide food and boost local markets.

ETHIOPIA
· We plan to mount an emergency response in the Oromia and Somali regions of Ethiopia, where there is an urgent need for food and water, especially for women, children, and the elderly.
· We also plan to provide cash for work, and initiate destocking, where Mercy Corps buys cattle to provide herders with much-needed income and the community with meat.
· We’ve been helping more than 625,000 Ethiopians gain access to food, water, income, nutrition and health education, and better farming resources and information.

Report from the Field
Joy Portella, Mercy Corps Communications Director
July 2011

The central element of this story is water; everyone is obsessed with finding it. I saw this in the eyes of the herder who’d been walking with his family — including his 10-year-old daughter — for 17 days to find water. I met a young woman with a baby who’d trudged eight hours to collect dirty water at a borehole, and was steeling herself for the grueling return trip. I witnessed a man climb a tree and ever so gently hold down a lone green branch so that his parched, starving camel could gain some strength.

…too often [our] great generosity is triggered by a sudden event that garners significant news coverage: the Haiti earthquake or Japan tsunami. When disasters happen slowly — like a drought and famine — they’re less visible and get less of a response, but that doesn’t make them any less severe.

…the people who are living the drought are simply busy struggling to survive. In the Horn of Africa, that struggle has become increasingly severe. The call for aid has rarely been as urgent.

Don’t wait. Act now! The Hunger Site

Stop Somalia’s Tragedy

From AVAAZ.org: The World In Action.

Dear friends,

More than 2000 people are dying every day in Somalia, in a famine that threatens to starve more than eleven million people to death. Conflict between Somalia’s Al-Shabaab regime and world leaders has kept out aid that could end the famine. But a few key countries have the power to broker a deal to stop the suffering.

Sign the urgent petition for a humanitarian truce and forward to everyone: AVAAZ.ORG

The famine-hit area is governed by Al-Shabaab, an Islamist regime that is linked to terrorist groups. The isolation and conflict between Al-Shabaab, other local leaders, and the international community has kept out much of the aid and trade that could end the famine. But a few key countries, including the United Arab Emirates, still trade with Al-Shabaab — they have an opportunity to broker a deal with the regime and break the stalemate that threatens the survival of millions.

We cannot let the politics of the war on terror claim any more innocent lives. It’s time for the international community and Al-Shabaab to come to an agreement to immediately get food to the suffering Somali people. The UN Security Council is meeting in a few days — let’s demand that they take immediate action to support key Arab nations in an effort to open talks with Al-Shabaab on cooperating to end the famine and seize this chance for a long-term political solution.

Somalia’s government was destroyed in 2006 by a US-backed invasion which feared Islamic extremism. But the tactic backfired. Since then, even more radical groups like Al-Shabaab took over and brutalized most of Somalia, and the international community has propped up a corrupt government whose control is limited to parts of the capital. The policies of isolation, invasion and pressure in the war on terror have not helped anyone, and now thousands of Somalis are dying every day. It’s time for a new approach.

The US has already stepped up to tackle the crisis, relaxing anti-terrorism laws that blocked aid from reaching the Somali people in Al-Shabaab’s region. Meanwhile, there are growing cracks within insurgent groups, and some leaders are willing to let aid in. But it is not enough to break the wall that surrounds those hardest hit by famine. Only bold international diplomacy can engage with all key parties to ensure that relief safely reaches the hundreds of thousands of desperate families.

One of Al-Shabaab’s largest sources of income comes from cutting down acacia trees for charcoal, which they illegally export primarily to the United Arab Emirates and other Gulf countries. These nations could now leverage their economic ties to Al-Shabaab to play a crucial diplomatic role and guarantee humanitarian access to famine-stricken areas.

We urgently need a new direction for Somalia — let’s appeal to the UN Security Council to support key Gulf countries to lead mediation efforts to ensure that Somalis dying behind Al-Shabaab’s lines are able to access life-saving food and health care for themselves and their starving children.

Together, Avaaz members have ensured crucial aid was delivered in Burma, Haiti and Pakistan after natural disasters, saving thousands of lives. Now, as the world watches heartbreaking images of dying children in shock and horror, we can urge key countries to show the leadership the Somali people urgently need — let’s stand together now and help end the tragedy in Somalia.

With hope and determination,

Luis, Stephanie, Maria Paz, Emma, Ricken, Giulia, Iain and the whole Avaaz team

TAKE ACTION AT AVAAZ.ORG

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