Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘farmer’

The First Treehugger

A tall tale from Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

The redwoods in Asia, being especially tall, were a favorite of Abbott Tova. She loved to climb as high as she could and observe life from above. She saw wildlife, people in the village, travelers on the road, and her sisters in the community below. Seeing that her excursions climbing the ancient ones were made in secret, she often witnessed events and scenes that others were not aware of.

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One day, she saw a herd of rampaging river otters approaching the village and was able to scamper down the tree and go warn people of their approach just in time. Many lives were saved. Some thought the Abbott must be clairvoyant for knowing of the approaching otters, not knowing of her climbing feats.

On another day, the Abbott watched a bandit attack a lone farmer on the road and steal his money. She knew who the bandit was and was later able to assist in his capture and testify at his trail, as to what he was wearing that day and at what time it had taken place.

There was the time Abbott Tova saw Sister Kiva sneaking off with Sister Bhakti to make love in the meadow. In that case there was no need to do anything, other than turn her attention elsewhere.

As was the case with Abbott Tova’s ability to remain still and blend in with her surroundings in the garden for hour upon hour, so it was in the trees where she often lost track of time and became so engrossed and selfless that she could feel the sap flowing through her veins and her limbs transferring the sun’s light into energy through her skin.

Without it being called so at the time, Abbott Tova was the first known tree hugger. Her actions gave rise to a long line of environmentalists and forest advocates, including, Pocahontas, Johnny Appleseed, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, Chico Mendes, Wangari Maathai, and Julia “Butterfly” Hill. It also gave her a great advantage in “seeing” the future, making predictions, and others believing she was omnipotent, which she would never deny, nor confirm.

More vast and small stories at: Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

Read React and Act

Dear Gabriel

A girl sick with hunger. A mother too poor to send her children to school. A farmer with weak, dying crops.

When the need is greatest, that’s when CARE steps in. The immediate and long-term solutions we provide and the lives we transform are possible through something immensely powerful: the generosity of our donors.

And now as a ferocious hunger crisis grips the Sahel region of Africa, and communities around the world are still in desperate need of help, a new matching gift fund has become available. Every dollar you give through August 22 will immediately be doubled, up to the match limit of $150,000.

There’s no secret formula to lifting people out of poverty: just the compassion and help of people like you. Please make your tax-deductible gift now and it will be matched.

I know that together, we can make extraordinary things happen. Last year, CARE reached more than 122 million people in 84 countries. There’s no way we would have been able to help individuals and families in the world’s poorest communities without the compassion of CARE’s donors.

But we don’t have time to celebrate our success – not when so many are struggling through the daily grind of poverty, trying to feed themselves and their children on less than a dollar per day.

Many of these people think they have no way out. But after over 60 years working in developing countries, we know how to help communities rise out of poverty. We help treat children suffering from malnutrition, support women running small businesses, and teach farmers how to get more milk from their cows or better harvests from their fields. We know that by investing in girls and women, we’re strengthening entire communities.

You make it possible for people in desperate circumstances to improve their lives. Please give by August 22 – help us reach our goal of $300,000, and your gift will go TWICE as far, up to the $150,000 match limit.

Thank you so much for all of your help. With so many millions of people suffering from the food crisis right now in the Sahel and so much continued need for long term poverty solutions around the world, your help is especially crucial this summer.

Sincerely,

Helene D. Gayle, MD, MPH
President and CEO, CARE

The Land Is Wasted

Dear Gabriel,

Emmanuel Kuru’s livelihood was destroyed.

In August 2008, the Shell Oil pipeline that ran through his property in the Niger Delta burst, smothering everything in its path with crude oil. His life as a fisherman and a farmer was wrecked.

“The land is wasted. Oil kills everything. We are stranded.”

Shell’s oil spill took away Emmanuel’s livelihood, his drinking water, the economic value of his land — his very way of life.

His neighbors, and tens of thousands of people living along the Niger Delta, have suffered the same devastating fate caused by oil spill after oil spill. While the Niger Delta has been awash in pollution, Shell has been swimming in profits — $30.9 billion globally in 2011.

Tell Shell — Own up. Pay up. Clean up. Make this message loud, clear and inescapable — add your name to Amnesty’s petition demanding justice for Emmanuel and the people harmed by Shell in the Niger Delta.

Ahead of Shell’s Annual General Meeting this May, Amnesty will deliver the signatures of hundreds of thousands of activists from around the world in an unsparing public message to CEO Peter Voser and Shell shareholders.

Oil spills are endemic in the Niger Delta, and Shell is the biggest culprit. Why does the oil giant refuse to come clean about its spills in Nigeria? Just yesterday, Amnesty International and the Nigerian NGO, the Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development, released new analysis showing that at least 103,000 barrels of oil were spilled over 72 days in Emmanuel’s town of Bodo — more than 60 times the volume that Shell repeatedly has claimed leaked.

But thanks to activists like you, corporations like Shell can’t hide their human rights abuses anymore. Amnesty International is calling Shell out in a big way, urging the company to make a clear and public commitment to contribute $1 billion as an initial payment to an independent clean-up fund.

People like Emmanuel deserve justice: a full clean-up, real reparations and a beginning to an end to their nightmare.

It’s time to hold Shell accountable and ensure it cleans up its act in Nigeria. Add your name to Amnesty’s petition against Shell today.

In solidarity,

Tanuka Loha
Director, Demand Dignity Campaign
Amnesty International USA

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