Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘fish’

Looking Good

imagesA beautiful excerpt from Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

Mistress Tova loved to eat. She ate whatever was provided, unless it was meat or fish, as she chose to not partake of anything that had eyes or a mother.

One evening, during the rainy season, when travel was the most enjoyable, a family offered Mistress Tova and her drenched wandering sisters some stale moldy bread. The Abbott’s students refused to touch the food, afraid it would make them sick, but their mistress ate heartily.

“That is the most delicious meal I’ve had in weeks,” she told the family, who beamed with pleasure at having their meager offering accepted by the great mistress.

As soon as the family left, Mistress Tova went behind a tree and threw up the entire meal. When she returned and the sisters asked her why she’d eaten the putrid bread, she said, “Sometimes, it doesn’t matter how you feel, as long as you look good.”

More good looking stories at: Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

Black Fish Out Of Water

Here’s a piece I created from a Portoro marble block which came from an island near Carrara, Italy.

This is the first marble I’ve attempted, which is the hardest stone. I was told that black is the most difficult, as it tends to crack easily. I guess I was lucky, as this one had no problems.

It is also one of the first I’ve done that attempted to actually look like something specific and not just go with the flow of the stone and what came as it was happening.

I tried to drill a hole in the bottom and place it on another piece of marble and a different stone, as the base, but I don’t have tools to make a deep enough hole and I was afraid it would crack. I tried using glue, but it didn’t hold and came apart. When all is said and done, it looks better by itself anyway.

Hope you enjoy this latest attempt. I’m getting a little better each time. It’s called Black Fish Out of Water.

DSC_0123-fish-right

DSC_0120-fish-mantle

DSC_0122-fish-left

DSC_0116-fish-ideal-position

Take Down The Nets!

Take down the nets!

sperm_whale_tailSperm whales are truly astonishing creatures; a deep-diving family-focused creature with a lifespan that rivals humans and the largest brain in the animal kingdom.

You wouldn’t think that an animal as big as a sperm whale would have much to fear, but they do. These endangered mammals face a deadly threat off the California coast: mile-long drift gillnets that can entangle their fins and tails, holding them underwater until they drown.

Help us reach our $50,000 goal to fight for endangered whales and other threatened wildlife»

Drift gillnets are set off California’s southern coast, left out overnight to catch swordfish and thresher sharks. These large nets create mile-long “walls of death” that will tangle up many sharks, turtles, marine mammals and fish that encounter them. Held underwater, air-breathing animals like whales and turtles will drown if they can’t get free.

Sperm whales are already endangered. Like humans, they tend to go several years or longer in between births and raising their young; which means that it will be a long time still before their population can recover from centuries of whaling. In 2010, the National Marine Fisheries Service estimated that 16 sperm whales were entangled in drift gillnets—a number that their small population just can’t handle.

Oceana is campaigning to remove these destructive nets once and for all off the U.S. West Coast and have them replaced with cleaner fishing gear. We can’t risk losing more whales to deadly nets.

Give by May 15 to help us fight for sperm whales and all the world’s oceans»

Thanks to supporters like you, this year Oceana stopped a proposed expansion of this fishery into a protected area for endangered leatherback sea turtles; but we can’t stop this fight until we can guarantee that all ocean waters off California are safe from these deadly nets.

For the oceans,
Rachael Prokop
Oceana

A Kaleidoscope of Species

Dear Friend,

Hawaiʻi’s famous coral reefs are known to contain a kaleidoscope of colorful species like the tinker’s butterflyfish, dragon eel, and harlequin shrimp. Unfortunately, if we don’t act soon, Hawaiʻi could lose these vibrant sea creatures and the reef ecosystems that depend on them.

Voice your support for protecting Hawaiʻi’s corals now.

The multi-million dollar exotic fish collection industry is capturing hundreds of thousands of bright coral reef fish and fragile invertebrates—many that play a vital role in protecting these corals—from Hawaiʻi’s reefs each year.

Alarmingly, the state is ignoring its own laws that mandate an environmental review before issuing permits for this potentially devastating practice. What’s worse, the state has absolutely NO limit on the number of these tropical marine creatures that can be captured for private profit.

Demand that the State of Hawaiʻi examine the cumulative damage to reef ecosystems before granting permits that allow unlimited removal of marine wildlife.

Coral reefs across the world are already at risk of ecological collapse—faced with serious threats from climate change, ocean acidification, and pollution. And, studies have determined that herbivorous fish and invertebrates on coral reefs—the primary targets of the commercial aquarium industry—are extremely important to reef health.

Earthjustice attorneys recently filed suit to require the state to comply with the environmental review procedures that are mandated by the Hawaiʻi Environmental Policy Act. But we need your support to put additional pressure on the state.

Scuba divers and snorkelers have indeed witnessed a disconcerting trend in recent years on their local reefs. One of our clients, a Hawaiʻi resident who has completed more than 10,000 scuba dives, has observed that particular species targeted by the tropical fish collection trade have completely vanished from certain reef areas. These devastating changes are taking place in areas that are open to commercial marine wildlife collection.

Our tenacious team of attorneys is fighting in court to demand that Hawaiʻi conduct an official environmental review of the effects of commercial aquarium collection on the reefs, and to stop all collecting while the study is being done. Please support our efforts to safeguard our nation’s coral reefs by sending a letter today!

Thanks for standing up for coral reefs and all of the marine wildlife that depend on them.

Sincerely,

Caroline Ishida
Associate Attorney
Earthjustice, Mid-Pacific Office

U.S. Parks Take Deep Breath

The Clean Air Act is now over 40 years old!
From National Parks Conservation Association

Clean Air

Air pollution is among the most serious threats to national parks. Dirty air can darken the horizon and ruin scenic views. It also damages plants, harms fish and other wildlife, and even affects the health of visitors and park staff. Most of the air pollution affecting national parks results from the burning of fossil fuels, especially by coal-fired power plants.

NPCA advocates for new regulations to clean up hundreds of outdated power plants spewing pollution that harms our lungs and parks. We’re also taking steps to protect America’s national parks from ill-conceived proposals to build new coal-fired power plants near the parks. November 2011 marked a major victory in the fight to reduce haze throughout the country—read about the consent decree that is set to reduce pollution in 43 states this year.

NPCA at work

For decades NPCA has advocated for park air quality protections and currently leads a national coalition whose efforts have resulted in an agreement mandating enforceable air plans for 47 states.

NPCA successfully fought an unnecessary power plant near Hampton Roads, Virginia. Thanks to more than 9,000 supporters who spoke out against it, Old Dominion Electric Company suspended its plans to build the plant. As a result, the air around several national parks will be subjected to less haze from airborne emissions, and people in nearby communities will be able to breathe easier, too.

NPCA recently reached a historic agreement with the Tennessee Valley Authority to retire some of its coal-fired power plants and reduce pollutants in the region.

NPCA’s California Clean Air and Climate program focuses on outreach, education, legislation and advocacy to promote cleaner air in the Pacific region. Field offices in Fresno, Joshua Tree, and San Francisco work with the parks, public, decisionmakers, and schools to fight for cleaner air.

NPCA helps coordinate a network of businesses in Virginia who voluntarily pledge to promote cleaner air. Learn more about the Virginians for Healthy Air Network.

National parks harmed by air pollution

Joshua Tree National Park has some of the worst air quality of any park, with record high ozone levels. On clear days, visibility is 100 miles, but haze pollution can cut views to 17 miles.

From 1999-2003, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks recorded 370 days with unhealthy air from ozone pollution. Over half of the Jeffrey and ponderosa pine trees are showing some level of ozone damage.

Ozone pollution in Rocky Mountain National Park has been higher than in urban Denver. On the haziest days, visibility at Rocky Mountain is approximately 57 miles- half the distance it should be.

The State of Florida has issued fish-consumption advisories in Everglades National Park due to high mercury levels in largemouth bass and other fish species.

Scientists at Mammoth Cave National Park have documented elevated levels of mercury in bats, including one species at risk of extinction—the endangered Indiana bat.

Estimated annual average natural visibility at Acadia National Park is 110 miles. However, air pollution reduces visibility to approximately 33 miles. Scientists measured some of the highest mercury concentrations in this park’s warm-water fish species, such as bass, perch, and pickerel.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park- our nation’s most visited national park, has spectacular overlooks that are severely impaired by haze. Scenic views in the park should extend for more than 100 miles, but air pollution cuts those views to around 25 miles.

Big Bend National Park has some of the worst visibility of any national park in the West. Scientists believe that mercury and other toxic compounds may be contributing to reproductive failure among peregrine falcons in the park.

Read more about clean air at National Parks Conservation Association, as well as information about all our countries beautiful national parks.

When A Puffin Is Hungry

Dear Gabriel,

When a puffin is hungry, it dives into the water for a fishy snack, but puffins aren’t the only creatures hunting for little fish.

These small “forage fish” such as herring or market squid are a popular food source for everything from puffins to whales. But some of these fish are also being fished by humans, and new fisheries could develop at any time, posing a danger to forage fish and everything that eats them.

With the help of activists like you, Oceana has been fighting hard to make sure these small fish are protected and managed in a way that ensures that the animals dependent on them will have plenty to eat. And with a new forage fish policy being considered by the California Fish and Game Commission, we are now close to a victory!

Help us reach a victory for little fish and keep California’s seabirds fed. Sign today»

A healthy forage fish population doesn’t just help puffins and whales. Important commercial and recreational fish such as Chinook salmon also thrive on these little fish. It’s important for everyone that forage fish remain abundant. But if we overfish just one of these critical species, the effects could be far-reaching. Removing too many forage fish from California waters could affect everything from the birds and whales offshore to the fishermen in our communities.

That’s why having a comprehensive forage fish policy is so important. The policy being considered for adoption would set a new course for fishery management to ensure a healthy population of forage fish in the ocean and prevent new fisheries from starting without sound science. But we need your help to make sure it passes.

Act now and tell the California Fish and Game Commission that forage fish management is necessary for our waters»

Even better, if you can be in Los Angeles on November 7, we want to hear from you. The California Fish and Game Commission will be voting on the policy at a public meeting, and we want as many supporters in the room as we can get! They’ll be taking comments from the public, and your voice could make a difference. If you’re available to attend, email Ashley Blacow at ablacow@oceana.org for more information.

Help make sure puffins and other California marine life have plenty to eat.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay

Go Fish, Go! Protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay
from National Parks Conservation Association.

In response to local concerns from Alaska Native Tribes and stakeholders, including NPCA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a draft watershed assessment in May 2012 that examines the extraordinary values of Alaska’s Bristol Bay watershed and identifies a multitude of serious, potential impacts that could result from developing an industrial mining district right next to Lake Clark National Park and Preserve.

This report will guide EPA’s use of the Clean Water Act to protect Bristol Bay’s clean waters and wild salmon from billions of tons of toxic mining waste. Learn More.

EPA should act now, and so should you! Send a letter thanking EPA for fighting to protect Bristol Bay.

Tag Cloud