Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘habitat’

Rainforest Larger Than Texas

Gabriel,

An area of Indonesian rainforest larger than the state of Texas has been destroyed over the last 50 years.

The forest is being logged, burned, or pulped at an alarming rate and its products shipped around the planet. Often for throwaway things like chicken buckets and napkins. It’s bad news for the planet and really bad news for the 400 remaining Sumatran tigers that call the Indonesian rainforest home.

If we lose these last 400 tigers, there’s nothing we can do to bring them back. Now more than ever we need your help to ramp up the pressure on companies buying rainforest fiber and to save the last Sumatran tigers.

Please make your most generous contribution today toward our campaign to save the Sumatran tigers and help us reach our goal of $25,000.

I’ve personally visited the Indonesian rainforest and can honestly say that the speed and scale of the devastation is hard to believe.

The Sumatran tiger is already classified as “critically endangered” — on the brink of extinction and barely hanging on.

They’ve lost 93% of their habitat because companies like Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) are destroying their forest homes. Tigers are left to roam landscapes where they are easily slaughtered by poachers for their body parts.

How many more acres of destruction can the Sumatran tiger survive before its status moves from “critically endangered” to “extinct”? We have to act, and fast.

Thanks to our efforts KFC — one of the major buyers of Indonesian rainforest fiber — recently announced a process to examine where it gets its paper from. But a process alone isn’t going to help save the 400 remaining Sumatran tigers from extinction.

That’s why we’re ramping up our campaign right now to make sure KFC develops a global policy that rules out deforestation. This can only happen with your support.

Our efforts to put pressure on the KFC board and continue our hard-hitting international campaign by doing things like dipping the Colonel in a tank of his own sauce all depend on you.

Make a gift to help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 by October 31st to save the last Sumatran tigers.

Since Greenpeace takes absolutely no money from corporations or governments, we rely on the power of individual supporters like you. With your help, we can achieve this.

For the forests,

Rolf Skar
Greenpeace Forest Campaign Director

Tigers Time Running Out

Gabriel

Last week, over 40,000 online activists sent a message to KFC CEO David Novak asking him to end his company’s relationship with rainforest destruction.

With only 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild, time is running out to save their forest homes from destruction for fast food packaging.

KFC is definitely feeling the heat. KFC restaurants in Indonesia have already cut business ties with notorious rainforest destroyer, Asia Pulp & Paper (APP). But there’s been nothing but a shameful silence from the company’s headquarters in Kentucky. That has to change.

It’s only going to happen if we keep up the pressure. And that’s exactly what we intend to do with your support.

Please make a donation of $5 so that we can continue to put pressure on KFC and save the Sumatran tiger from extinction.

With so few tigers left in the wild, and their habitat disappearing fast, it is important that we act now to protect them.

Greenpeace is funded by people, not corporations, and the success of this campaign depends on activists like you uniting to stand up to corporate greed.

With your support, we’ll fight back with our expert staff on the ground, international market pressure from customers, and worldwide media exposure — but we need to do it now. The Indonesian rainforest, where the only wild Sumatran tigers left on the planet live, is being destroyed every day at an alarming rate.

For the price of a loaf of bread, please donate $5 today to help save the Sumatran tigers by getting KFC to end its relationship with rainforest destruction.

For the forests,

Rolf Skar
Greenpeace Forest Campaign Director

Canadian Wolves In Sights

Dear Gabriel,

It keeps getting worse.

To make up for the fact that rapid tar sands extraction is threatening caribou herds by destroying vast swaths of forest habitat in Alberta, the Canadian government has called for killing thousands of wolves.

Tell Prime Minister Harper: Stop Canada’s planned tar sands wolf killings! Click here to automatically sign the petition.

If Alberta Canada’s tar sands fields are fully developed, an area of boreal rainforest the size of Florida will be eviscerated, leaving in its wake giant ponds of toxic wastewater.

It’s obvious why this would pose a massive threat to all wildlife species who reside there, including birds, wolves, woodland caribou and the iconic spirit bear.

But instead of preserving the habitat caribou need for their survival, the Canadian government’s answer is to blaze ahead with tar sands extraction, and kill thousands of wolves who would naturally prey on the caribou. A paper released by the National Wildlife Federation reports that The Ministry of the Environment’s plan calls for aerial shooting, and poisoning with bait laced with strychnine — a particularly painful type of poison.

Tell Prime Minister Harper: Stop Canada’s planned wolf killings! Preserve caribou habitat, and stop the irresponsible tar sands mining which threatens all of us. Click here to automatically sign the petition.

This plan to kill wolves is a misguided, cruel response that does nothing to alleviate the greater problem: tar sands oil extraction is a huge threat to wildlife, local communities, and all of our futures.

But despite the clear negative consequences, the Canadian government continues working to rapidly expand tar sands production and sales, including promoting the Keystone XL Pipeline to export refined tar sands bitumen all over the world.

Understandably, this has begun to earn Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, and many in the country’s government, a negative reputation to which they are becoming increasingly sensitive.3

The Ministry of the Environment has not yet begun this planned wolf kill. With enough public pressure, we can get them to abandon the plan, and build the case for Canada to stop their devastating race to expand tar sands development.

Click below to automatically sign the petition:
http://act.credoaction.com/r/?r=5532375&id=35696-266627-gf5FCIx&t=10

Thank you for fighting tar sands and all their devastation.

Elijah zarlin, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

Save Bryce Canyon

Save Bryce Canyon from Dirty Coal

Dear Gabriel,

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is on the verge of approving a massive 3,500 acre coal mine right next to Bryce Canyon National Park.1

The BLM’s own analysis shows that the mine will cause major adverse environmental impacts like increased water and air pollution,2 devastating a huge area directly next to Bryce Canyon’s unique ecosystem.

Despite these concerns the BLM just released its environmental review proposing that the mine be approved. BLM is currently accepting public comments on its proposal and strong public opposition is needed to convince the BLM to reverse course and reject this dirty coal mine.

Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Don’t allow coal mining next to Bryce Canyon National Park. Click here to submit a public comment.

The Bureau of Land Management’s review identified more than a dozen negative impacts this proposed mine is likely to have. These include water quality degradation, increased hazardous air pollution, loss of wildlife habitat, increased coal truck traffic and noise levels, adverse effects to recreation resources and an increased risk of fuel leakage, solid waste spills and wildfires.

In addition to the problems the BLM identified, burning coal from the proposed mine would also be a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, which experts say are now growing faster than previously anticipated worst case scenarios.3

Given all of the problems this mine is expected to cause, it simply isn’t in our best interests. Yet the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed action is to allow this dirty, 3,500-acre coal mine to move forward.

National Parks and federal lands belong to all of us, and BLM needs to hear from people who don’t want these special recreation areas and wildlife habitats — especially not Bryce Canyon — to be endangered in order to mine for dirty coal.

Tell the Bureau of Land Management: Don’t allow coal mining next to Bryce Canyon National Park. Click here to submit a public comment.

Thanks for fighting to protect Bryce Canyon from the threat of coal mining.

Josh Nelson, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

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