Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘habitats’

Airgun Blast Kills Whales

Dear Gabriel,

right_whale_and_calf_NOAA_webA whale’s ears can be more important than its eyes. And one loud airgun blast may deafen a whale forever. A deaf whale is a dead whale. Without a way to communicate, hear danger, or sound out the waters, whales and dolphins deafened by seismic airgun blasts may find themselves lost, hungry, or killed by a predator they couldn’t detect.

These blasts are used to find oil and gas under the seafloor, and they may soon be used in Atlantic waters off the U.S. coast. Oceana is fighting to block these plans and protect our Atlantic shores. Become a 2013 member today to join the fight to save the Atlantic and all the animals who are threatened by these deadly blasts »

The waters slated for seismic airgun testing include territory used by endangered North Atlantic right whales. With less than 500 of these whales left, we can’t afford to let a single one be harmed by seismic airguns. These airguns create blasts as loud as dynamite and go off every 10 seconds for weeks at a time.

We’ve gathered thousands of signatures against seismic airgun testing from activists like you, including 40,000 on the official White House petition site. Our organizers on the ground are bringing together coastal communities and rallying against these dangerous plans. We’ve managed to get seismic testing in the Atlantic delayed—but we’re not going to stop fighting. Can we count on your help?

After seismic testing in Madagascar, dozens of melon-headed whales beached themselves and died. The Department of the Interior estimates that 138,500 dolphins and whales will be injured by the proposed testing in the Atlantic.

Harmful seismic testing is also the first step to oil drilling off the Atlantic coast, bringing the threat of deadly oil spills to new waters. Your 2013 Oceana membership will help us ramp up our efforts to protect dolphins, whales and their habitats in the Atlantic and all over the world »

For the oceans,
Rachael Prokop
Oceana

Cubs Swimming To Death

Dear Gabriel,

A few days ago, my colleague Heather sent you an online-photo gallery in honor of International Polar Bear Day, Wednesday, February 27th. One of the photos really broke my heart. It was this one here: a mother swimming with her cubs. It broke my heart because so many polar bear cubs die in long distance swims like this one — as many as 45% in one observational study.

Fact7

This photo was a vivid example to me of the real impact of climate change.

Please make an emergency donation of $15 or more today to support our work to save these threatened Polar Bears.

At an alarming rate, global warming is melting the Arctic sea ice that polar bears depend on to hunt for food … threatening this noble Arctic creature with extinction.

Here are the sobering facts:

According to experts, two-thirds of the world’s polar bear populations could be lost by mid-century as sea ice continues to retreat.

Less Arctic sea ice forced 40% more Alaskan polar bear moms to den on land — away from food sources.

As sea ice disappears, bear mortality rises. In the Beaufort Sea region about 1/3 fewer polar bear cubs are surviving their first year of life.

The last ten years (2004 to 2013) have seen the ten lowest January sea ice extents (total area covered by sea ice) on the record.

Gabriel, we we urgently need your help to continue the fight to avoid the catastrophic consequences of climate change and save irreplaceable wildlife and their habitats.

Donate as little as $15 today to support our work will help make sure that our beloved wildlife can continue to be found in the wild, and NOT just in nature photographs.

Thank you for your support.

Sincerely,

Emily Stevenson
Manager, Online Membership
Environmental Defense Fund

Turtles, Dolphins & Oil

Dear Gabriel

It can take a female loggerhead up to 30 years before ever laying one egg. And all it takes is one layer of oil to cause damage or death to the baby sea turtles inside.

Two years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill proved how disastrous drilling can be for wildlife. Now Congress is proposing to open even more areas to drill in the Gulf of Mexico – putting adult and baby loggerhead sea turtles at risk. Will you help us keep them safe?

Help us protect Florida’s animals from the threat of oil spills – just $10 will make a difference!

Loggerhead turtles are already threatened with extinction, and their numbers continue to fall as their habitats are destroyed. Eighty percent of loggerheads in the U.S. call Florida their home – so damage to their nesting beaches could be catastrophic to the species’ survival. But in the past several months, members from both chambers of Congress have pushed for legislation to open up the Eastern Gulf of Mexico to drilling – an area that has been historically off limits.

We are pushing back, and have organizers on the ground in Florida to show Congress how strong our movement is. So far we have been successful, but the threats to Florida’s wildlife keep coming, and we need your help.

Your support helps keep Florida’s nesting grounds clean and safe. Give $10 or more by April 30 and help protect sea turtles and other wildlife from danger»

All it takes is one spill like the Deepwater Horizon accident to put turtles, dolphins, and manatees at devastating risk. It’s just not worth it.

It’s up to us to prevent needless deaths. You and I are the oceans’ protectors, and with our combined efforts, we can keep Florida’s waters safe from oil drilling.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Tag Cloud