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Posts tagged ‘Haiti’

Super Typhoon Haiyan

Super Typhoon Haiyan

I’m writing you from the Philippines where I’m managing CARE’s ongoing response to Super Typhoon Haiyan.

Relief Efforts Continue After Typhoon Haiyan's DestructionThe situation we’re dealing with on the ground is unlike any I’ve ever experienced in my 20 plus years as an emergency response specialist.

My team of seasoned veterans and I delivered life-saving aid after the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the Haiti earthquake of 2010, and the drought-stricken Horn of Africa in 2011.

haiyan-e4-debrisBut none of those disastrous events were as challenging as this one. The remoteness, flooding and debris everywhere in the affected areas means that simple journeys can take days. The widespread magnitude of the damage means limited to no access by land or air and no lines of communication or electricity up and running.

There are pictures below, but they don’t truly capture the experience on the ground: the smell, the complete destruction in every direction you look, the heavy rain, the continuous exhaustion because there is nowhere for anyone to sleep, debris everywhere. And – worst of all – the desperate look in the eyes of survivors.

They’re hungry and they’ve been hungry for days. The food is just gone, picked clean.

It’s truly awful. We need your help. You can help us put food, shelter, and necessities in the hands of Filipinos and others in need.

Within the next 48 hours, we’ll be distributing food to thousands of families outside of Ormac City. Frankly, it’s frustrating that we can’t get supplies to more survivors more quickly. We plan to help an initial 150,000 storm survivors with the support of donors like you. Food and shelter are our current priorities.

Coordinating the response to Super Typhoon Haiyan has been so much more challenging than Haiti. It’s not even that the weather is horrible or that today’s office/sleeping space lost its roof and flooded out.

Communication during emergency response is critical, but here the electricity is down, the phone lines aren’t working, there is no internet. Thank goodness for our satellite phones.

In Haiti, communication was back up very quickly. And the earthquake was in a small area, so once the rubble was cleared, it was easy to drive and deliver aid. We could get everywhere affected in two or three hours. The airport was up and functioning quickly, so supplies could be brought by air, or road from the Dominican Republic.

Here in the Philippines, the disaster is spread over several islands. It takes days to get to places – not only for relief items, but for staff. You have to take a boat, and then a car, and the road hasn’t been cleared. The government and international community are working to clear the roads and open the airport, but it is taking time.

Once it does, we know what we need to do to help. I only hope you’ll be there during this critical time to support our response. Donate to CARE right away to help with disaster relief efforts in the Philippines and other places impacted by crisis and poverty.

Sincerely,

David Gazashvili
CARE Emergency Team Leader

A Glass of Water

Dear Gabriel,

I’m not afraid to drink a glass of water from the faucet of my home. Fact is, most of us are confident that the water we drink, bathe, and clean with is safe.

But in places like Haiti, that’s not always the case. The need for sanitation and clean water is overwhelming. In Port-au-Prince, hundreds of thousands of people have no access to clean water. Imagine being a woman in a rural place like Grand Anse, where finding a private place to use the bathroom can be life threatening because you don’t know who or what might be watching.

JanTrip_COB_2

It’s with the monthly support of people like you that we can build wells, sanitary latrines, and safe spaces for women – helping provide some of the basic, essential tools a woman needs to pull herself out of poverty. You can change a life right now just by making your monthly gift today.

Help us bring clean water, safety, and support to women all over the world. Make a monthly gift to CARE by January 31. You can enter to win a trip to see our work in action!

The support of donors changes lives. We’ve seen it again and again, but it never feels less miraculous.

This is why we’re giving you a chance to visit a CARE project and meet the men, women, and children whose lives you’ve touched.

See the official rules for details, but I can tell you it’s a truly inspiring experience. I’ve never once returned home without feeling inspired by the strength of the people I’ve met.

As a CARE supporter, I know that you’re committed to building a better world, where girls can go to school, women can start a small business, and families have enough food. In Haiti alone, the generosity of CARE’s donors has done incredible work. With a Food Voucher program, vulnerable families get nutritionally balanced food that helps support the local economy by relying on food produced in the area. Last June, we launched a 5-year program to protect vulnerable girls and women, prevent abuse, and help survivors of violence. We work in communities to help identify infrastructure needs, move public works projects forward, build family latrines and showers, and prevent cholera.

Our work in Haiti isn’t finished – our work all over the world isn’t complete – but we rely on your support to keep moving forward.

I can think of no more meaningful way to help build a better world than becoming a Partner for Change. Our monthly donors are truly at the forefront of our work in over 70 countries around the world, fighting poverty and empowering people to change their own lives.

If you want to see the world change, let’s start now: together. Become a Partner for Change by Thursday and you can enter to win a trip to a CARE project!

Sincerely,

Helene D. Gayle, MD, MPH
President and CEO, CARE

Help Haitians Here

Dear Gabriel,

From Haiti to the Gulf Coast, Hurricane Isaac wreaked havoc, hitting vulnerable communities the hardest. Oxfam staff in these regions are seeing the damage throughout the Gulf region, including in New Orleans where water reached areas that had never seen flooding before.

In Haiti, thousands of people faced flooding, landslides, and wind damage in the wake of the tropical storm. More than two years after the earthquake that leveled Port Au Prince, 400,000 people are still living in tents and were extremely at risk of storm damage.

Oxfam is on the ground helping Haitians in the wake of this latest crisis. We’re intensifying our work on cholera prevention to reduce the risk of deadly outbreaks from unclean drinking water and poor sanitation.

Make a contribution to support Oxfam’s efforts in Haiti.

In Her Own Words

In Her Own WordsFINCA Haiti Client Bertride Beaufils

As told to Glaphyra Guillaume, FINCA Haiti Communications Associate, and translated from Creole:

“My name is Bertride Beaufils. I am 40 years old and live in Fonfred, a locality of Les Cayes. I grew up with my mother who was retailing fizzy [sodas], and my father was retailing cigarettes and alcohol. My parents put me at school, but when I was in secondary school, they became unable to continue paying for me. They decided to pay for me to go to a dressmaker center.

“Because of a disease, I am unable to practice this profession, so I decided to start running a business in order to be independent. Today, I am retailing groceries. I purchase in the public market of Les Cayes, and retail at home every day from 6am to 10pm.

“I heard talk about FINCA a long time ago from a friend who was a member. Since my first experience with FINCA, I appreciated the welcome I received from the credit officer. About one year ago, I decided to take a loan. I received a first loan of $200 and invested it in my business. Today, I am managing a larger, third loan.

“During a period, I was in the stew with the owner of a house that I rent, so I decided to own my house. My savings in my FINCA group was really useful for me in this time. I am not married and do not have children, so today I am focused on my business, and want to increase it more and more, thanks to FINCA loans.”

You can support Bertride and people like her here.

Women Fight Back

Dear Gabriel,

In this country, discrimination against women can take subtle forms: “glass ceilings” at work or “second shifts” at home. But in some countries where FINCA works, women often face worse-than-invisible barriers.

When women proudly announce their intentions to help lift their families out of poverty by becoming self-employed FINCA clients, they may be mocked and their hopes ridiculed.

FINCA calls out these attitudes for what they are: nonsense holding back entire societies. But we can’t do this alone; we rely on your support. Add your voice today: become a Voice of Hope by supporting FINCA’s mission to empower women across the developing world.

Please act today, because members of FINCA’s Board of Directors have generously offered to match all gifts up to a total of $165,000. Your gift today or before November 25th will go twice as far!

With FINCA loans, hundreds of thousands of courageous women are shattering limits imposed on them:

Denied access to financial services – no longer. FINCA loans provide hope and opportunity to women determined to build their businesses, provide a better life for their families, and repay their loans – as nearly all do.

Limits to the respect women deserve – not any more. Many FINCA clients report newfound mutual respect in their marriages as their businesses contribute income to their households.

Limited sense of self-worth – eclipsed! Self-confidence burns brightly in successful microentrepreneurs – thanks to FINCA supporters like you.

Rosena Lafleur is a Voice of Hope

Born in Haiti into a life of poverty and forced out of school at age 10, illiterate and without any reason to be hopeful, today Rosena says, “I think that my business will increase rapidly and it will be easier for me to reach my goals. I say thank you to FINCA!” How has she turned her life around? With hard work, determination, with hope – and with the help of FINCA supporters like you.

Today, you have the easy part: Support FINCA and together we will prove to women across the developing world that there is hope, that they can work their way out of extreme poverty.

Remember, with just a $200 FINCA loan, Rosena was able to expand her business and increase her earnings. You can help the next Rosena to start her own thriving business with just one gift today. It’s that simple.

Please make a stand for the empowerment of women today. Make your voice a Voice of Hope – and let’s shatter the second class status and rights too many women are forced to contend with.

Thank you,

Soledad Gompf
Vice President,
New Business Development
FINCA

How to Help Japan

Here are some ways you can help the people of Japan recover from the worst earthquake and tsunami in their recorded history.

The Red Cross has already launched efforts in Japan. Go to Redcross.org or text REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10 from your phone.

Save the Children has responded. Donations can be made to its
Children’s Emergency Fund.

To donate or learn about additional ways to contribute to the medical response, go to Internationalmedicalcorps.org. You can also text MED to 80888 from your mobile phone to give $10.00.

GlobalGiving.org is gathering funds to be given to a variety of relief organizations helping quake victims. It’s already raised over $100,000, most notably from concerned Twitter users around the world. Visit them at: The Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund.

Please don’t forget about all the other people around the world who have been rebuilding and recovering from earthquakes, floods, tsunamis and other disasters (Haiti, Pakistan, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Southern India, China, Peru and more).

Lend a hand, provide support and visit:

Mercy Corps.

Red Cross.

Green Crescent.

The Goods: Help Send Relief To Haiti.

The Clinton Bush Haiti Fund.

Shelter Box.

CARE International.

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