Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘Oceana’

Over 100 Million Years Old

Dear Gabriel,

Adopt a sea turtle for a loved one this holiday season – and be a part of the urgent fight to save these ancient creatures.

When you adopt a sea turtle before December 1, you’ll get 10% off. Just enter the code EARLYBIRD at checkout. Shipping is free!»

All seven species of sea turtle are over 100 million years old, making them some of the very few animals to survive since the time of the dinosaurs.

Many migrate across entire oceans every year from their feeding grounds to the beaches where they lay their eggs.

Along that route, they face danger. Many turtles are caught in fishing nets and held under water for hours – left to struggle for air and then drown.

But with your help, we can save them. Adopt a sea turtle and play an important role in reducing the dangers these amazing creatures face every day.

Don’t wait! The holidays are just around the corner. Adopt a sea turtle or other ocean animal and get 10% off before December 1 when you enter the code EARLYBIRD at checkout.

Adopting a sea turtle is easy. With one $75 gift, you’ll send your loved one an amazing gift unlike any other, all while helping protect these ancient creatures. Included in the sea turtle adoption pack:

• Cuddly plush sea turtle
• Personalized adoption certificate
• Sea turtle cookie cutter
• Seasonal cookie recipe
• Knowledge that their adoption is helping sea turtles around the world.

For just $5 extra, we’ll do the gift wrapping for you – and if you want to make your gift greener, you can send the certificate electronically!

And the best part? Shipping with delivery by Christmas is free for a limited time.

Oceana is working hard to win protections for sea turtles and other animals that get brutally killed as bycatch. Adopt a sea turtle today to make sure those efforts stay strong in the coming year.

Sea turtles need advocates – and by adopting one you’re becoming one of their strongest supporters. Adopt a sea turtle or other ocean animal today – shipping is free!

With so many sea turtles at risk, the right choice for gifts this season is adoptions. Thank you for all that you do.

For sea turtles everywhere,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

When A Puffin Is Hungry

Dear Gabriel,

When a puffin is hungry, it dives into the water for a fishy snack, but puffins aren’t the only creatures hunting for little fish.

These small “forage fish” such as herring or market squid are a popular food source for everything from puffins to whales. But some of these fish are also being fished by humans, and new fisheries could develop at any time, posing a danger to forage fish and everything that eats them.

With the help of activists like you, Oceana has been fighting hard to make sure these small fish are protected and managed in a way that ensures that the animals dependent on them will have plenty to eat. And with a new forage fish policy being considered by the California Fish and Game Commission, we are now close to a victory!

Help us reach a victory for little fish and keep California’s seabirds fed. Sign today»

A healthy forage fish population doesn’t just help puffins and whales. Important commercial and recreational fish such as Chinook salmon also thrive on these little fish. It’s important for everyone that forage fish remain abundant. But if we overfish just one of these critical species, the effects could be far-reaching. Removing too many forage fish from California waters could affect everything from the birds and whales offshore to the fishermen in our communities.

That’s why having a comprehensive forage fish policy is so important. The policy being considered for adoption would set a new course for fishery management to ensure a healthy population of forage fish in the ocean and prevent new fisheries from starting without sound science. But we need your help to make sure it passes.

Act now and tell the California Fish and Game Commission that forage fish management is necessary for our waters»

Even better, if you can be in Los Angeles on November 7, we want to hear from you. The California Fish and Game Commission will be voting on the policy at a public meeting, and we want as many supporters in the room as we can get! They’ll be taking comments from the public, and your voice could make a difference. If you’re available to attend, email Ashley Blacow at ablacow@oceana.org for more information.

Help make sure puffins and other California marine life have plenty to eat.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Powerful Majestic Creatures

Dear Gabriel,

Sperm whales are one of the world’s most powerful, majestic sea creatures – but they’re no match for drift gillnets.

In just one year, an estimated 16 sperm whales were drowned in gillnets off the coast of California. That’s not counting the sharks, turtles, dolphins, and other open ocean animals that are caught in greater numbers.

These nets, which are supposed to catch swordfish, are notorious for killing some of our oceans’ most endangered species. They should be banned—but instead they continue to kill turtles, sharks, whales and more.

That kind of indiscriminate killing of ocean wildlife cannot be allowed to continue, so we are fighting to stop the use of swordfish drift gillnets off the coast of California.

You can help us meet our $40,000 goal if you chip in – and until October 31, every gift you give will be MATCHED for double the impact. Donate just $10 today and join the fight to stop deadly gillnets»

The destructive power of gillnets cannot be underestimated, even for the formidable sperm whale.

Up to 65 feet long and weighing over 50 tons, these deep diving whales can hold their own against nearly anything in the oceans. But sperm whales were prized by whalers in the 18th and 19th centuries for the spermaceti oil contained in their large heads, and were hunted mercilessly.

They grow slowly, taking time to raise their young between births. Without human interference, a sperm whale may live to be 70 years old. But a young whale caught in a net doesn’t just lose those decades of life—it loses its chance to have babies and help replenish a population still struggling from the effects of whaling.

Six weeks ago, we filed our formal intent to sue the federal government for violating the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. This is precisely the kind of action that will force the government to protect endangered ocean wildlife threatened by gillnets.

While they can be expensive, these lawsuits work. A similar lawsuit in 2009 forced the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service to grant protections for the endangered loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles. Our fight against the use of drift gillnets in places where endangered sea creatures reside could save more turtles and whales – but only if we have the resources we need to win.

With your help, we can continue the fight for sperm whales and other ocean creatures around the world. Give $10 today and we’ll DOUBLE your support!»

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Little Fish Big Fish

Dear Gabriel,

Seabirds carry small fish from the oceans to their nests to feed their babies, but soon they may be finding less to eat. Humans are fishing more and more of these little fish to feed to larger fish in fish farms or to grind up as fertilizer, and the oceans are feeling the pressure.

These little fish provide food for everything from whales to seabirds to people, and science shows they are too important to the future health of the oceans and the earth to just be ground up into fishmeal or fertilizer.

Whales and birds need fish too. Tell the Pacific Fishery Management Council to protect sea creatures’ dinners»

A humpback whale may eat up to 2,000 pounds of little fish every day. If we overfish and cause a population collapse for the little fish, whales and other animals could have a hard time finding enough to eat.

But it’s not too late to take action. If we set up precautionary protections for small “forage” fish and let their populations grow, there will be more food to go around in the future—even for us humans.

Let’s save the little fish. Sign today to protect forage fish and keep the oceans fed»

Small fish swimming in schools are easy to catch. But it will become a lot harder if we catch them all, and animals like whales and baby birds will have to face the consequences of our actions.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Turtles, Dolphins & Oil

Dear Gabriel

It can take a female loggerhead up to 30 years before ever laying one egg. And all it takes is one layer of oil to cause damage or death to the baby sea turtles inside.

Two years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill proved how disastrous drilling can be for wildlife. Now Congress is proposing to open even more areas to drill in the Gulf of Mexico – putting adult and baby loggerhead sea turtles at risk. Will you help us keep them safe?

Help us protect Florida’s animals from the threat of oil spills – just $10 will make a difference!

Loggerhead turtles are already threatened with extinction, and their numbers continue to fall as their habitats are destroyed. Eighty percent of loggerheads in the U.S. call Florida their home – so damage to their nesting beaches could be catastrophic to the species’ survival. But in the past several months, members from both chambers of Congress have pushed for legislation to open up the Eastern Gulf of Mexico to drilling – an area that has been historically off limits.

We are pushing back, and have organizers on the ground in Florida to show Congress how strong our movement is. So far we have been successful, but the threats to Florida’s wildlife keep coming, and we need your help.

Your support helps keep Florida’s nesting grounds clean and safe. Give $10 or more by April 30 and help protect sea turtles and other wildlife from danger»

All it takes is one spill like the Deepwater Horizon accident to put turtles, dolphins, and manatees at devastating risk. It’s just not worth it.

It’s up to us to prevent needless deaths. You and I are the oceans’ protectors, and with our combined efforts, we can keep Florida’s waters safe from oil drilling.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Dolphin Deaths in US

Dear Gabriel,

Did you know that dolphins are being killed right off our shores?

You haven’t seen it in the newspaper, but it’s true. In the northeast US alone, around 600 dolphins – some of the smartest, most playful animals in the world — were caught by fishing nets in just the last year.

And that is just in one place. This is happening wherever people fish. We are working to cut these tragic deaths, but we need your help.

Free dolphins from fishing nets. Tell the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to protect dolphins and the ocean»

One of the worst offenders are gillnets: weighted walls of mesh that sink to the ocean floor and trap everything large enough to get its fins caught in the net – and far too often, that means dolphins.

We need more eyes on the ocean to count the number of dolphins caught and killed – and that’s where you come in.

We are working to ensure that fishery managers minimize the deaths of dolphins and other marine mammals, count the dolphins they do catch, and stay within the set limits. We need your help to tell the government that we simply can’t stand by and let dolphins drown in fishermen’s nets.

Dolphins have complex brains and human-like levels of self-awareness. They are suffering – and we can’t let it happen anymore.

If we all make our voices heard, we can minimize these deaths. Tell the US government to free dolphins from fishing nets»

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Sea Turtles Survive

Dear Gabriel,

Every North American sea turtle is at risk—but we can save them together

Donate now to win important protections for sea turtles and the oceans we share»

Have you ever had the chance to see a sea turtle in the wild?

It’s no surprise if you haven’t. Six different species of sea turtles live in North American waters, but thanks to disappearing nesting beaches and destructive fishing gear, every single one of them is listed by the federal government as being threatened or endangered with extinction.

Sea turtles and the oceans that depend on them are in trouble – and we need your help if we’re going to save them. Give now to help reach our goal of $100,000 by the December 31st deadline.

Every year, sea turtle nests get crushed by people and cars. The baby turtles that hatch must get past a slew of predators in the air and water. And the precious few that make it into deeper waters and adulthood must somehow survive a gauntlet of fishing hooks and gear that kill thousands of turtles each year.

We can’t keep losing so many sea turtles. Not only are sea turtles a vital part of a healthy ocean ecosystem, they are some of the oldest living animals on our planet. Unless we do more to protect sea turtles now, our children and grandchildren may never get a chance to know these incredible creatures.

Thankfully, there is good news. Because of your financial support, Oceana has won many important victories, saving thousands of sea turtles and improving the health of our oceans.

Just this past summer, we took action to stop thousands of needless turtle deaths in the Gulf of Mexico. Our researchers uncovered shrimpers illegally using nets without turtle escape hatches. Without these escape hatches, sea turtles get trapped under water and drown to death. Your support allowed us to expose this crime against sea turtles and our oceans, and it will allow us to hold the government accountable for enforcing the law.

This kind of victory couldn’t have happened without your support. And if we’re going to build on that progress and win more, we’ll need your help once more.

Oceana is the largest organization in the world that takes a comprehensive approach to protecting sea turtles in every ocean at every stage of their life. We play a critical role by looking at how one fishery’s activities add to another’s, and at how protecting turtles in one ocean can impact the other side of the planet. Your contribution will fund our campaigns to protect areas sea turtles need in order to recover, and to hold the government accountable under the Endangered Species Act.

Be the reason we can save sea turtles today – and prevent an ocean with no turtles tomorrow. Make a tax-deductible donation to Oceana today.

For the oceans,
Tatiana Marshall
Oceana

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