Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘photographer’

Photographing Iran

From The Globalist

Recording the Truth in Iran
Photographs by Kaveh Goldestan
Reviewed by Ruchi Shukla

While on assignment for the BBC in the Northern Iraqi town of Kifri in 2003, Iranian photographer Kaveh Golestan died after stepping on a land mine.

Since before the Islamic Revolution of 1979, he was the only Iranian photojournalist who had a continuing presence in the country until his death in 2003.

Variety of images

In his book “Recording the Truth in Iran,” some of his most famous images from different collections have been selected so as to give a historical explanation for the present situation in Iran.

The collections vary in their timeframe as well as their subjects. Although he was primarily a war photographer, Golestan also covered such subjects as the prostitutes in Tehran, children in a mental asylum, the laborers of Tehran — and the Qaderi Dervishes of Kurdistan.

Besides his war-time images, these photographs give us a glimpse into the life of Iran.

History of Iran

Kaveh Golestan has covered all the major political upheavals in his country. His photographs tell the stories of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, the first Gulf War, the U.S.-led war against the Taliban in Afghanistan and the current war in Iraq.

In 1988, Kaveh Golestan was one of the only photographers who captured the nerve gas attacks outside of the village of Halabja in Iraqi Kurdistan.

Recording the truth

While most Western media did not cover the attacks because they were compliant towards Saddam Hussein — who at that time was still a U.S. ally — Golestan was furious when his images did not make it into any major media besides Time Magazine.

Even while working in London, Golestan made several trips every year to Tehran to photograph and chronicle the happenings in the country.

He was there in 1979 when the Ayatollah Khomeini came back to power — and captured his funeral in 1989. His pictures told the story of the people behind the war lines.

Read entire review and see photos at The Globalist.

Strong Sense of Self

Excerpt from Transfigurations by Jana Marcus.

You must have a very strong sense of self to transition. (Tiffany, 42)

If I were able to transition when I was in my teens, like youth can today, I would have been socialized as other young girls are. But would I have been forced to buy into stereotypical behavior, attributes, and social norms that most young women are raised with? Would I be a cookie-cutter conformist with a very narrow idea of what a girl is and what kind of woman she should be? Would I have been raised to be a good girl, find a white knight, and raise a family?

It would have been beneficial to my physical appearance to be on estrogen before so many male features became permanent. It’s much harder to transition later in life, and I have had to rid myself of male baggage and socialization. But when that process was done I had a semi-blank slate to create my own idea of what a woman can be, instead of what society thinks she should be. By constructing the woman I am today, I was able to become my own creation, with healthier ideas and qualities I wanted to embody, such as intelligence, humor, individuality, strength, grace and class, as well as my own sense of style and unique place in the world.

I’m proud to be trans; it’s who I am. The outcome of my struggles is what makes me special, not whether I’ve had surgery to create a vagina. Millions of women have a vagina and it doesn’t make them special. What makes a person special is who they are inside, what they do with their lives, and how they make a difference in the world. That’s the kind of woman I am – always aiming to make a difference.

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