Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘poachers’

Orphaned Baby Elephants

This is a story of tragedy that’s turned into a tale of hope. It’s the story Suni and 12 other orphans need you.

Most of the 13 baby elephants’ mothers were killed by poachers, and now they require round-the-clock care.

That’s why IFAW has entered an exciting new partnership, the Zambia Elephant Orphanage. I’ve committed $100,000 this first year to help protect and raise the orphaned baby elephants. I’m hoping you’ll play a part by helping today.

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Like me, you feel a special connection to animals. We both know that elephants face many threats, and orphaned baby elephants need special care to survive. Will you please help by making a holiday gift for elephants today?

Suni was found dragging herself along a road, her right back leg paralyzed by a horrific axe attack by an unknown assailant. She was rescued and brought to the Orphanage.

The round-the-clock care given by the Orphanage’s Keepers and veterinarians has helped Suni regain some use of her leg, but she still is not able to walk normally. We’re keeping our fingers crossed that the constant veterinary care she’s receiving at the Orphanage will result in a full recovery.

The Orphanage was started by Game Rangers International to give orphaned baby elephants a safe home to grow up in. Working in close partnership with the Zambia Wildlife Authority and The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation, IFAW is supporting the Orphanage’s efforts.

After a period of months or even years, the elephants will be moved to the protected Kafue National Park, where they will hang out with other elephants and continue their rehabilitation. Eventually the grown-up orphans will say goodbye to their keepers and become part of an existing wild family.

We’re protecting the baby elephants and providing them with nourishing food and medical care, as well as a nurturing, mothering presence. It’s a team effort and we need you on the team.

We’re working in many ways to fight the heartless poachers, but while that struggle continues we need to care for orphaned baby elephants, like Suni. Won’t you please help Suni and other animals in need today?

Thanks, and happy holidays.

Jason Bell
IFAW Program Director, Elephants

Mammal Friends Murdered

About the Ivory
From Bloody Ivory.org

In 1979 there were an estimated 1.3 million African elephants. A decade later, widespread poaching had reduced that figure by half. Just 600,000 African elephants remained.

Africa’s savannahs and forests were no longer sanctuaries for elephants; they had been turned into graveyards.

In 1989, a worldwide ban on ivory trade was approved by CITES. Levels of poaching fell dramatically, and black market prices of ivory slumped.

CITES had saved the African elephant. Or had it?

Since 1997, there have been sustained attempts by certain countries to overturn the ban. In 1999, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe were allowed an ‘experimental one-off sale’ of over 49,000kg of ivory to Japan. Then in 2002, a further one off-sale was approved, which finally took place in 2008 – and resulted in 105,000kg of ivory being shipped to China and Japan.

Today, levels of poaching and illegal trade are spiralling out of control once again. In many areas, rates of poaching are now the worst they have been since 1989. In 2009, over 20,000kg of ivory was seized by police and customs authorities worldwide and in 2011, just thirteen of the largest seizures amounted to over 23,000kg. Countries continue to report localised extinctions of small vulnerable elephant populations and a number of range States (countries which have elephants) are edging closer to losing all their remaining elephants.

March 2010

Despite this, at CITES’ Fifteenth Conference of the Parties in March 2010, Tanzania and Zambia tried to reduce the level of protection their elephants are afforded and also sought approval for a one-off sale of over 110,000kg of ivory to China and Japan. Although their Proposals were in direct contravention of the spirit a nine-year moratorium on ivory trade, agreed by all range States in 2007, the final wording of that moratorium unfortunately had a loophole which Tanzania and Zambia tried to exploit.

Many feared that if approved, the ivory sale would again increase demand for ivory in the Far East and endanger the future survival of many of Africa’s more fragile elephant populations that simply could not withstand any more poaching pressure.

Due to the hard work of many, including the African Elephant Coalition (formed of 23 African elephant range States), CITES rejected both Tanzania’s and Zambia’s Proposals.

March 2013

Once again, at CITES’ Sixteenth Conference of the Parties in March next year, Tanzania is seeking approval to sell ivory – over 101,000kg of it. This despite losing almost a quarter of it’s elephant population between 2006 and 2009 and authorities seizing 19,800kg of ivory originating in or exported from Tanzania between 2009 and 2011. Once again elephants need your help.

Bloody Ivory.org is intended to be a central portal of information about ivory trade, elephant poaching and the impact of CITES on Africa’s elephants. It provides you with a voice to join in the battle to protect elephants, who still need your support to stop the trade in their ivory.

Say NO to the ivory trade and spread the word!

Rainforest Larger Than Texas

Gabriel,

An area of Indonesian rainforest larger than the state of Texas has been destroyed over the last 50 years.

The forest is being logged, burned, or pulped at an alarming rate and its products shipped around the planet. Often for throwaway things like chicken buckets and napkins. It’s bad news for the planet and really bad news for the 400 remaining Sumatran tigers that call the Indonesian rainforest home.

If we lose these last 400 tigers, there’s nothing we can do to bring them back. Now more than ever we need your help to ramp up the pressure on companies buying rainforest fiber and to save the last Sumatran tigers.

Please make your most generous contribution today toward our campaign to save the Sumatran tigers and help us reach our goal of $25,000.

I’ve personally visited the Indonesian rainforest and can honestly say that the speed and scale of the devastation is hard to believe.

The Sumatran tiger is already classified as “critically endangered” — on the brink of extinction and barely hanging on.

They’ve lost 93% of their habitat because companies like Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) are destroying their forest homes. Tigers are left to roam landscapes where they are easily slaughtered by poachers for their body parts.

How many more acres of destruction can the Sumatran tiger survive before its status moves from “critically endangered” to “extinct”? We have to act, and fast.

Thanks to our efforts KFC — one of the major buyers of Indonesian rainforest fiber — recently announced a process to examine where it gets its paper from. But a process alone isn’t going to help save the 400 remaining Sumatran tigers from extinction.

That’s why we’re ramping up our campaign right now to make sure KFC develops a global policy that rules out deforestation. This can only happen with your support.

Our efforts to put pressure on the KFC board and continue our hard-hitting international campaign by doing things like dipping the Colonel in a tank of his own sauce all depend on you.

Make a gift to help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 by October 31st to save the last Sumatran tigers.

Since Greenpeace takes absolutely no money from corporations or governments, we rely on the power of individual supporters like you. With your help, we can achieve this.

For the forests,

Rolf Skar
Greenpeace Forest Campaign Director

Only 400 Left In the World

Dear Gabriel,

Only 400 Sumatran tigers are left in the world.

Just 80 years ago, there were three unique subspecies of tigers found in Indonesia. Today, two of them are extinct — and now the last one is in serious trouble.

At these horrifically low numbers, every day counts for the Sumatran tiger.

They need our help now. Please make an urgent donation to help save them.

The Sumatran tiger is classified as “critically endangered” — on the brink of extinction and barely hanging on.

They’ve lost 93% of their habitat because companies like Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) are destroying their forest homes. Tigers are left to roam landscapes where they are easily slaughtered by poachers for their body parts or shot by the people moving in.

How many more acres of destruction can the Sumatran tiger survive before its status moves from “critically endangered” to “extinct”? We have to act, and fast.

To fight back, we need your help to expose the massacre, pressure corporations like KFC to cut ties with APP and fight on the ground in Indonesia to save these last remaining Sumatran tigers.

We can’t wait another day. Not when we’re dealing with a population of only 400 tigers. If we don’t act now, these beautiful animals will be pushed to extinction — gone forever.

Since Greenpeace takes absolutely no money from corporations or governments, we depend entirely on you to power our independent and hard-hitting campaigns. Will you help save these 400 Sumatran tigers?

Please help us raise $60,000 in the next 9 days to make it possible. We need just 360 people from California to reach our goal.

Without you, these 400 tigers don’t stand a chance. APP will continue lining its pockets with profits, poachers will continue shooting these tigers and reselling their body parts in places like China, and these last Sumatran tigers will just be collateral damage.

Together, we can stop them.

With the financial help of supporters like you, we’ve already put the squeeze on APP, convincing major companies like Nestle, Kraft and Mattel to stop buying products linked to rainforest destruction. And other companies have followed suit as well.

Over the past few weeks we’ve turned up the pressure on KFC to end their relationship with APP and to stop using rainforest fiber in its throw-away paper products. We’ve hit them in the press, at their corporate headquarters, on the web, over the phone lines and at stores around the world. We have plans to do even more — but we need your support to keep this work going and save the Sumatran tiger.

Please give a gift today to help give these last Sumatran tigers a future — before it’s too late.

Together we’ve rallied to overcome seemingly insurmountable problems and won victories to protect the planet — and I know we can do it again to save the Sumatran tiger.

Together we are powerful, together we make a difference.

For the forests,

Rolf Skar
Greenpeace Forest Campaign Director

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