Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘season’

The Nature of Being

51cq5sixWzL._SY346_The Mystery: Zen Stories by Dan Glover.
Reviewed by Gabriel Constans.

Unlike my book of satirical stories (Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire), which was a take-off on the insightful wisdom stories in the classic collection Zen Flesh, Zen Bones, Mr. Glover has put together a serious, and in-depth look, at the nature of our being, by presenting eighty-one stories in eleven sections. Here is a glimpse from the introduction, of what The Mystery: Zen Stories lays bare.

This book seeks to illuminate the subtle relationship between the unknowable world and what we know by experiencing the world. It is based in part upon ancient texts written down some two thousand five hundred years ago brought up to date so as to be more applicable to the present day Western culture. In many respects, these tales sound autobiographical, though no one person has “likely” experienced everything within.

The different sections, which are titled as a season (Breath of Spring, Autumn Giving Way, etc.) each begin with a beautiful haiku, then dive into topics such as acceptance, loss, water, stillness, perception, and non-attachment, but in the context of stories and experiences. Mr. Glover has a delicious way with words and is able to see things from many perspectives, and not what may always be expected.

“I once heard of a man who was said to be in possession of a great understanding far surpassing any other. Making many inquiries I discovered where this man lived. The journey was long; the way very difficult and arduous. After months of travails, I reached this man’s abode. He seemed to have been expecting me; looking delighted to see me standing at his door he waved a hand for me to enter.

Without saying a word he brought refreshments. Sitting silently together we ate and we drank. When the meal was finished I got up and I left. When I arrived back home my wife inquired if I had found the man who I had been seeking for so long. I nodded my head. She asked if he had shared his great understanding with me. I smiled at her and looking into her eyes I could see she knew without being told.”

There is so much to be said about this book, yet I am hesitant to say anymore, as my words seem insufficient to describe the breadth and depth of its spirit. I think it best, at this moment, to let The Mystery: Zen Stories speak for itself.

“I hold that we come forth without roots. We enter the world by no aperture. We have real existence but this has nothing to do with place, such as our relation to space; we have continuance but it has nothing to do with beginnings or ends, such as our relation to time. The door of the mystery is non-existence. All things come from non-existence; non-existence is the same as not existing. This is the secret of the ages.”

Nothing From Nothing

An empty excerpt from Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

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There is nothing to defend, protect, or discover, because there is no thing. Nothing from nothing leaves nothing. You’ve got to have something, if you want to be with me. But, if I am no thing and you are no thing, then you need not have any thing to be with me, since we do not actually exist as individual entities.

We must keep what we call our minds open to the vastness of being. In what we see as reality we are both nothing and everything. There is nothing which we are not part of, yet nothing is the totality of who we are.

This is one of the most difficult teachings to understand with the human mind. That is why we must understand it beyond the mind, with the essence of who we are or whom we think we are.

Some of you may ask, “What is our essence?” Of course, you already know the answer, because you consist of the same essence as I, which is difficult to express in words. Some people say we are mostly made of water and minerals and that is true. Others say we have energy fields that run our biological systems and radiate outwards and that is true. Yet others would insist that we are merely matter with limited brain capacity and that too would be a factual statement. Yet, none of these explanations contain the ultimate truth or explain who or what we are.

That is why we must say that we come from nothingness and return to nothingness. That is why we know that we are no thing, yet every thing. This is what makes us unique and yet the same. We have the answers, yet there are no answers.

Sit and think upon these things, even though there is no one thinking. Blessings to you all; whoever you are.

From a talk given to followers during the sunny season in 417 B.C.

More of the same at: Zen Master Tova Tarantino Toshiba: The Illustrious and Delusional Abbess of Satire.

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