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Posts tagged ‘South Sudan’

Celebrating in South Sudan

Women for Women International (WfWI) South Sudan

Despite the ongoing violence and worsening food crises in South Sudan, Women for Women International recently celebrated the first graduating class of women in South Sudan. The 277 program graduates, who began their training last spring, each received a graduation certificate at ceremonies in the Yari, Payawa, Longamere and Ronyi communities.

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Women spoke of their personal success stories, and graduates who were trained in bread-making offered mandazi, a popular type of bread, to those in attendance.

Reflecting the important ways men can champion women’s equality, many men – from the mayor of Yei and other government representatives to the graduates’ husbands, brothers, and fathers – attended the ceremony to support and congratulate the women. A number of them spoke positively of the impact of the training program on their wives, sisters, and daughters, how successful the women had become, and the transformative impact on their families and communities.

This May and June, we have over 1,800 women graduating from our programs in Afghanistan, Iraq and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Help us celebrate our graduates in South Sudan and elsewhere with a donation that celebrates a special graduate in your life.

Child Marriage In South Sudan

Dear Gabriel,

girl-smile-200x160Marriage isn’t just a milestone. It’s a hugely important decision that determines the course of the rest of your life. It’s not a decision to enter into lightly and certainly not one a 12-year-old can make responsibly.

But in South Sudan, child marriage of girls as young as 12 isn’t just legal, it’s common. Sign the petition demanding an end to child marriage.

Nearly half of South Sudanese girls between 15-19 are married, often at the behest of their family. These girls suffer profound consequences and diminished opportunities. Once married, girls often are denied education, diminishing their earnings potential. Girls quickly become young mothers with high-risk pregnancies and are more susceptible to violence and abuse.

It’s not enough for a country to help girls end abusive marriages. South Sudan needs strong laws to make sure all marriages are consensual — and that means setting 18 as the minimum marrying age.

Tell South Sudan to enact strong laws to prevent coerced child marriage.

Thank you for taking action,

Emily V.
Care2 and ThePetitionSite Team

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