Here, There and Everywhere

Posts tagged ‘whales’

Whale Meat for Lunch

Dear Gabriel,

The world is finally getting wise to the serious ethical and environmental problems with consuming whale meat. You’d think with demand dropping, the Japanese would finally let go of their devotion to whaling.

Instead, Japan has introduced a host of measures to prop up the whaling industry and force more whale meat onto people’s plates.

Japan’s barely legal whaling industry continues under the auspices of “science.” But the industry has operated at a loss for years, costing the government roughly $60 million every year to sustain. Instead of giving up, Japan is doubling down, loosening regulations on sales and increasing the amount of whale meat in school lunches, even though it would increase kids’ risk of mercury poisoning.

It’s time for Japan to get with the program and realize that the world doesn’t want whale meat.

Tell Japanese officials to stop prolonging the long-awaited abandonment of whaling.

Thank you for taking action,

Emily V.
Care2 and ThePetitionSite Team

When A Puffin Is Hungry

Dear Gabriel,

When a puffin is hungry, it dives into the water for a fishy snack, but puffins aren’t the only creatures hunting for little fish.

These small “forage fish” such as herring or market squid are a popular food source for everything from puffins to whales. But some of these fish are also being fished by humans, and new fisheries could develop at any time, posing a danger to forage fish and everything that eats them.

With the help of activists like you, Oceana has been fighting hard to make sure these small fish are protected and managed in a way that ensures that the animals dependent on them will have plenty to eat. And with a new forage fish policy being considered by the California Fish and Game Commission, we are now close to a victory!

Help us reach a victory for little fish and keep California’s seabirds fed. Sign today»

A healthy forage fish population doesn’t just help puffins and whales. Important commercial and recreational fish such as Chinook salmon also thrive on these little fish. It’s important for everyone that forage fish remain abundant. But if we overfish just one of these critical species, the effects could be far-reaching. Removing too many forage fish from California waters could affect everything from the birds and whales offshore to the fishermen in our communities.

That’s why having a comprehensive forage fish policy is so important. The policy being considered for adoption would set a new course for fishery management to ensure a healthy population of forage fish in the ocean and prevent new fisheries from starting without sound science. But we need your help to make sure it passes.

Act now and tell the California Fish and Game Commission that forage fish management is necessary for our waters»

Even better, if you can be in Los Angeles on November 7, we want to hear from you. The California Fish and Game Commission will be voting on the policy at a public meeting, and we want as many supporters in the room as we can get! They’ll be taking comments from the public, and your voice could make a difference. If you’re available to attend, email Ashley Blacow at ablacow@oceana.org for more information.

Help make sure puffins and other California marine life have plenty to eat.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Walls of Death

Dear Gabriel,

Sea Turtles Caught in “Walls of Death”

Endangered turtles and whales need your help. Deadly drift gillnets off the coast of California are threatening the lives of leatherback turtles, sperm whales, and other marine animals. These mile-long nets, left out overnight to catch swordfish, create an underwater “wall of death” for anything unlucky enough to swim into them.

These nets should be banned, but instead the fishery may soon expand. We’re fighting to protect these rare and important creatures, but we need your support. Donate $10 today and your gift will be DOUBLED!

Oceana.org

Powerful Majestic Creatures

Dear Gabriel,

Sperm whales are one of the world’s most powerful, majestic sea creatures – but they’re no match for drift gillnets.

In just one year, an estimated 16 sperm whales were drowned in gillnets off the coast of California. That’s not counting the sharks, turtles, dolphins, and other open ocean animals that are caught in greater numbers.

These nets, which are supposed to catch swordfish, are notorious for killing some of our oceans’ most endangered species. They should be banned—but instead they continue to kill turtles, sharks, whales and more.

That kind of indiscriminate killing of ocean wildlife cannot be allowed to continue, so we are fighting to stop the use of swordfish drift gillnets off the coast of California.

You can help us meet our $40,000 goal if you chip in – and until October 31, every gift you give will be MATCHED for double the impact. Donate just $10 today and join the fight to stop deadly gillnets»

The destructive power of gillnets cannot be underestimated, even for the formidable sperm whale.

Up to 65 feet long and weighing over 50 tons, these deep diving whales can hold their own against nearly anything in the oceans. But sperm whales were prized by whalers in the 18th and 19th centuries for the spermaceti oil contained in their large heads, and were hunted mercilessly.

They grow slowly, taking time to raise their young between births. Without human interference, a sperm whale may live to be 70 years old. But a young whale caught in a net doesn’t just lose those decades of life—it loses its chance to have babies and help replenish a population still struggling from the effects of whaling.

Six weeks ago, we filed our formal intent to sue the federal government for violating the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. This is precisely the kind of action that will force the government to protect endangered ocean wildlife threatened by gillnets.

While they can be expensive, these lawsuits work. A similar lawsuit in 2009 forced the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service to grant protections for the endangered loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles. Our fight against the use of drift gillnets in places where endangered sea creatures reside could save more turtles and whales – but only if we have the resources we need to win.

With your help, we can continue the fight for sperm whales and other ocean creatures around the world. Give $10 today and we’ll DOUBLE your support!»

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Arms Around Antarctic

Dear Friends,

Antarctic waters are home to almost 10,000 species including many of the world’s great whales. But industrial fishing fleets, roaming ever further, threaten their survival. Amazingly we now have a chance to save them by getting governments to create the world’s largest network of marine protected areas there.

In days, 25 countries will meet behind closed doors to decide the fate of Antarctica’s Southern Ocean. Most of them want to save it, but Korea and Russia are leading an effort to scupper the deal for the sake of their own fishing interests. If enough of us raise our voices now, we can break open this meeting, isolate the wreckers, get behind the champions and help create a vital refuge before it’s too late.

The whales and penguins can’t speak for themselves, so the outcome is up to us. Once 750,000 people have signed, Avaaz will flood the talks with hard-hitting billboard ads to cause a stir and convey our message to key delegates. Sign the petition to save the Antarctic Ocean:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/save_the_southern_ocean_1/?bMPbqab&v=18723

An incredible myriad of animals live in these remote waters, many found nowhere else on Earth. Orcas, blue whales, leopard seals, Emperor and Adelie penguins, Antarctic petrels — they are threatened like never before by a cruel mix of rapidly advancing fishing technology and climate change. Massive protected zones in the Southern Ocean is the only way to guarantee their survival.

For the last 20 years mining and oil drilling have been banned in the Antarctic. And CCAMLR, the 25 member governing body that regulates the ocean in this region, has already committed in principle to creating these marine protected areas. But the two plans being negotiated — one to protect part of the fragile Ross Sea and one for East Antarctica — are at risk of dilution or delay. Let’s make sure that disagreement doesn’t destroy our dream of saving Antarctica’s ocean… and our planet.

A small group of negotiators now holds the future of this ocean in their hands. They won’t put the planet before profits – unless they know we’re paying attention! Let’s unleash a massive surge of global pressure right now. Click the link below to sign and then share the petition with everyone!

http://www.avaaz.org/en/save_the_southern_ocean_1/?bMPbqab&v=18723

We know we can win on oceans. Our community has already helped establish the two largest marine reserves in the world. Let’s throw our arms around the Antarctic Ocean now and save it before it’s too late.

With hope,

Alex, Luis, Lisa, Ricken, Laura, Emma, Jooyea and the whole Avaaz team

Deafening Sea Cannons

Halt the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project

Started by: tobey, Cambria, California

The goal of the seismic imaging project is to attempt to measure the three major earthquake fault lines which run along our coast. The existence of these fault lines, especially after the continuing disaster at Fukushima, Japan, call into question the advisability of maintaining the Diablo Canyon nuclear power facility, operating near Avila.

The proposed testing will do nothing to prevent an earthquake on any of these fault lines. The tests will instead produce a large amount of data about dangers that we cannot avoid when these earthquakes occur.

Here is how the environmental impact report for the project describes it:

“The offshore component of the Project would consist of operating a geophysical survey 29 vessel, its associated survey equipment, and support/monitoring vessels . … The survey would be conducted along the central coast from approximately Cambria to Guadalupe (including marine protected areas around Cambria and elsewhere). … 18 active air guns … would discharge once every 15 to 20 seconds.”

In other words, huge underwater cannons would blast ear-shattering sounds under the water in an area from Guadalupe to Marin County. (These same measures are used to search for offshore oil reserves — coincidence?)

The environmental impact report indicates these tests would kill or injure marine mammals, including seals, dolphins, whales and otters. They could make them go deaf which would mean a lingering death. Already depleted fishing resources would be impacted. Seabirds would be affected as well, with little or no way of mitigating the impacts. Migratory birds would be affected as the tests would go on 24 hours a day and lights at night would be required. Air quality would be impacted and the project would contribute to climate change.

The ocean is our most precious resource. If the life of the ocean does not matter then neither do our lives. Some few persons stand to make lots of money from this outrageous project. PG&E will pass on the costs to us, the consumers. We and all life in the ocean and the land around us stand to lose. And for what?

The project will not prevent the next earthquake. And if it happens and Diablo crashes, so do we. Think of the economic impact of such a disaster. A recent issue of The Economist has on its front cover a statement that says the dream of nuclear power has become a nightmare. It is time to put our resources into safe energy and abandon nuclear power. Please sign this petition.

FOR LATEST INFORMATION PLEASE GO TO STOP THE DIABLO CANYON SEISMIC TESTING PROJECT AT

http://www.facebook.com/StopTheDiabloCanyonSeismicTesting

Photo by Mike Baird, flickr.bairdphotos.com

Click here to sign tobey’s petition, “Halt the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project“.

You can also check out other popular petitions on Change.org by clicking here.

PG&E DEAFENING SEA LIFE

Gabriel,

The blue whales, humpback whales, sea otters, dolphins and porpoises living off of California’s central coast are at serious risk of coming under attack from deadly seismic testing.

An energy company called Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) is trying to get approval to continue operating a dangerous nuclear power plant that sits at the intersection of multiple earthquake fault lines. It is hoping a map of the Shoreline Fault’s deeper regions will help with the approval process.

The testing proposal calls for powerful air cannons to shoot deafening underwater explosions every 13 seconds for 42 straight days to create a map of the sea floor in an area that California has set aside as a marine reserve. According to one local official, the testing would “cleanse the Point Buchon State Marine Reserve of all living marine organisms.” We can’t let that happen.

There’s a public forum happening on Monday to discuss this issue. Greenpeace will be there and we want you to join us. Help us collect 40,000 messages of support from around the country for protecting all these amazing marine creatures by taking action today.

Tell the California Fish and Game Commission to block PG&E’s reckless seismic testing plan and to protect the blue whales, humpback whales and other creatures that call the Pacific coast of the United States home.

We know the horrible effects this kind of testing has on marine life. It’s been done before. Each underwater blast will be at a volume level that will instantly deafen and possibly kill everything unfortunate enough to be in its path in the most barbaric way imaginable.

PG&E knows what this testing will do. The company has already offered compensation to local fishermen who rely on the area for their livelihood. But the impacts of this testing would go on for years and its impossible to put a pricetag on the loss of a species like the blue whale.

Humpback and blue whales have actually just begun appearing in amazing, pre-hunting numbers in the area to feed on krill for the winter. We’ve been waiting decades for this. These whales and other marine life don’t need to die so that an energy company can profit by continuing to operate a dangerous nuclear power plant on top of earthquake fault lines.

Gabriel, this is your chance to speak out against PG&E’s crazy plan. Make your voice heard and take action today to save the marine life off the coast of central California from deadly seismic testing.

Sincerely,

Phil Kline
Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner

Navy Deafening Whales

Dear Friends,

According to the U.S. Navy’s own estimates, the use of high-frequency underwater sound for testing off the coasts of California, Hawaii, and beyond will deafen 15,900 whales and dolphins and kill 1,800 more over the next five years.

Whales and dolphins depend on sound to navigate and live. The Navy is required to include comments from the public on their Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), so your signature and comment on my SignOn.org petition could help stop this naval program and save the lives of these ocean creatures.

My petition says:

Stop the killing of 1,800 whales and dolphins and the deafening of 15,900 more by ceasing the operation of the Navy’s underwater sound system in the Hawaiian Islands, the California and Atlantic Coasts, and the Gulf of Mexico.

Will you sign the petition? Click here to add your name, and then pass it along to your friends:

http://www.moveon.org/r?r=276609&id=45297-1274818-PLu9SXx&t=2

Thanks!

–Lyndia Storey
MoveOn Member

PS: The comments must be in by July 10, 2012, so please sign today.

Little Fish Big Fish

Dear Gabriel,

Seabirds carry small fish from the oceans to their nests to feed their babies, but soon they may be finding less to eat. Humans are fishing more and more of these little fish to feed to larger fish in fish farms or to grind up as fertilizer, and the oceans are feeling the pressure.

These little fish provide food for everything from whales to seabirds to people, and science shows they are too important to the future health of the oceans and the earth to just be ground up into fishmeal or fertilizer.

Whales and birds need fish too. Tell the Pacific Fishery Management Council to protect sea creatures’ dinners»

A humpback whale may eat up to 2,000 pounds of little fish every day. If we overfish and cause a population collapse for the little fish, whales and other animals could have a hard time finding enough to eat.

But it’s not too late to take action. If we set up precautionary protections for small “forage” fish and let their populations grow, there will be more food to go around in the future—even for us humans.

Let’s save the little fish. Sign today to protect forage fish and keep the oceans fed»

Small fish swimming in schools are easy to catch. But it will become a lot harder if we catch them all, and animals like whales and baby birds will have to face the consequences of our actions.

For the oceans,
Emily Fisher
Oceana

Whale’s Being Slaughtered

Dear Gabriel,

Japanese whaling ships are closing in on whales in the Southern Ocean right now. They call their mission “science,” but no valid science is gathered from their hunts — it’s just a cover for their bloody activities.

It’s not science, it’s senseless killing, and it must end.

Make an urgent gift today to protect whales, the oceans, and our planet.

We’re only two days away from December 31 and so close to reaching our $125,000 goal. We need just 7 more donations from California to reach it and have the resources we need to save whales in the new year.

Whales are smart creatures — they know where they are and who they are. They feel loss and pain. They “talk” to each other. A growing body of evidence shows that whales are very similar to humans in intelligence and self-awareness. There is nothing scientific about killing nearly every whale you encounter and selling the meat for profit.

Commercial hunts by any name must end.

Please donate now to stop the killing and save whales from this deadly “science.”

With your help we’ll mobilize public support, run newspaper ads, lead a coalition of NGOs and pressure the Obama administration and the International Whaling Commission to close these deadly loopholes and put an end to commercial whaling once and for all.

We’ve already been successful in dramatically reducing the market for whale meat to the point where the industry is shutting down. But operations like Japan’s are being propped up by government subsidies.

Right now is the time to tip the scales and completely end commercial whaling. Now’s our chance, and Gabriel, there’s not much time left.

For the whales,

Philip Radford
Greenpeace

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